The Deaths of Two Brothers

Posted on January 18, 2017 in Family History

Today I was attempting to find an obituary for my 2nd great-grandfather, Theobald Meisberger. Instead I stumbled across a little notice in the Mount Carmel Daily News, Monday, 18 June 1900 on page 1. It was in a column headed Locust Gap News.

Funeral Notice John Meisberger 18 June 1900

I transcribed the relevant portion of the item as follows:

“A large number of our people attend-
ed the funeral of John Meisberger at Shamokin on Saturday.”

Saturday’s date would have been 16 June 1900.  When I read this, the name and date immediately grabbed my attention. John Meisberger is the brother of Theobald Meisberger, who died Wednesday, 13 June 1900. Now I am finding out that John, may have died the same day or within days of his brother since he was buried on the 16th.

I tried to find more about John’s death. On Find A Grave, a photo of the tombstone of Theobald C. Meisberger is displayed in John’s memorial not John’s tombstone.  John’s death date is listed as Jun., 1900. An earlier post, Tombstone Tuesday – Theobald Meisberger (1837 – 1900) discusses Theobald’s tombstone.

John is my 3rd great uncle, son of Michel Meisberger and Margarethe Bettinger Meisberger. He was born 8 April 1841 in Steinbach, Rhenish Prussia (today Saarland, Germany), Cemetery records for St. Edward’s RC cemetery in Shamokin, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, record John Meisberger as the possessor of one lot containing three graves. One of two graves contain his daughter, Elizabeth Meisberger, born 10 October 1870 and died 21 September 1871; the other his son Michael A. Meisberger, born and died 22 September 1874. The third grave is described as ‘appearing empty’.

At this point I have not found any document that contains John’s death date. We only know that he was buried on 16 June 1900. Although John appears as head of household in the 1880 US census, I have been unable to locate him in the 1900 US census.

Per the probate records and Theobald’s tombstone, Theobald died on 13 June 1900. The cemetery record says Theobald was buried on the 13 June 1900.  Calculating Theobald’s death date using 62y, 5m, and 18d as carved on the tombstone, the date of death is 12 June 1900.

I wonder if the two brothers did die within days of each other or was the funeral notice really meant for Theobald. I think they both died but it would be nice to obtain more evidence. Still searching…

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(Not So) Wordless Wednesday – Who Is in This Wedding Party?

Posted on January 11, 2017 in Wedding Wednesday, Wordless Wednesday

I am using this theme primarily to post my mystery photos in hopes that someday I’ll be able to solve them.

furlani-bianchi-wedding-1911-corr-sm

 

This photo was unidentified and in the box of photos that my sisters and I inherited from our mother.

While not everyone in this photo is unidentified, most are. This is a photo of the wedding party of my paternal grandparents, Candido [Condy] Furlani and Anna Bianchi. They were married 20 September 1911 in St. Peter’s RC Church, Mt. Carmel, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. Condy is 23 years old while Anna is only 17. She needed her mother’s consent on the marriage license since 17 is underage for marriage in Pennsylvania.

The following are the people I do recognize. The happy couple (Anna and Condy) are sitting front row center. Also on the far right of the front row is Anna’s brother, Peter Bianchi. The gentleman directly behind the bride may be another brother, Leon [Attillio] Bianchi. I have not been able to match a name to any of the remaining eight (8) individuals that form this wedding party. The photo appears to have been taken at a professional studio or possibly a hall where they held a reception rather than in the church.

I am open to any information or corrections concerning this photo. I would love to be able to put names to their faces and to better understand this photo.

Posted in Wedding Wednesday, Wordless Wednesday | 2 Comments

Old Bones Genealogy Blog – Top 5 Posts for 2016

Posted on January 4, 2017 in Blogging

2017 has already begun, but initially, I want to look back at this blog’s most popular new posts of 2016. The ranking here is based solely upon the number of readers.

top-5-wood-sm

5.  Maryland Early State Newspapers Online

The Archives of Maryland Online (AOMOL) currently provides access to over 471,000 historical documents that form the constitutional, legal, legislative, judicial, and administrative basis of Maryland’s government. Online access enables users to research such topics as constitutional records, city directories, land records, military records and many early state records.

4.  Tech Tuesday – Using SmartDraw for Genealogy

There is an interesting piece of software called SmartDraw that I’ve been using for several years. Prior to that I used Microsoft Visio to do my graphic flowcharts, workflows, images and various charts that I saved as JPG or PDF and used in my PowerPoint presentations, reports, etc.

3. Tech Tuesday – Using Transcript for Transcribing Documents

Transcript a little tool, developed by Jacob Boerema, that helps you transcribe text from digital media. Back in 2011, I had just accepted a job to transcribe 52 early deeds so I began looking for something that might make the job, if not easy, at least easier—and I discovered Transcript.

2. A Great Genealogical Find – Lord Baltimore’s Receipt Book

How would you like to acquire a copy of your 18th century ancestor’s signature? I found this amazing discovery while browsing around the Archives of Maryland Online website.

1. 10 Ways to Avoid Common Genealogy Mistakes (Tuesday’s Tip)

Genealogy is not something that can be done from start to finish in a weekend or even a year of weekends. It is, however, an enjoyable activity that is done by millions of people. While you enjoy doing your family research, I am sure you would like your family tree to be as accurate as possible. Here are 10 ways to avoid genealogy’s most common mistakes.

 

Thank you for visiting my blog and making this a great year. I hope you continue to read my posts in 2017. I wish a healthy, prosperous and happy New Year to you and yours! Best wishes for the coming year and may we all realize our goals.

Posted in Blogging | 6 Comments

Blog Caroling – O Come, O Come, Emmanuel

Posted on December 22, 2016 in Blog Caroling
With the permission of footnoteMaven

With the permission of footnoteMaven

 

Per Wikipedia, the words and the music of “O come, O come, Emmanuel” developed separately. The Latin text (“Veni, Veni, Emmanuel) is first documented in Germany in 1710, whereas the tune most familiar in the English-speaking world has its origins in 15th-century France. It was adapted by T. Helmore, 1811-1890 from a 1st Mode Responsory in a 15th century French Processional.

Technically, I guess this is an Advent hymn rather than a Christmas carol but I always remember singing it during the Christmas season so it means Christmas to me.

You can hear a version of “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” performed by Enya at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPHh3nMMu-I.

The official Catholic version of the lyrics is below:

O Come, O Come, Emmanuel
Translation by John Neale, 1818 – 1866, et al

O Come, O come, Emmanuel,
And ransom captive Israel,
That mourns in lonely exile here
Until the Son of God appear.

Refrain:
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel!

O come, Thou Wisdom, from on high,
And order all things far and nigh;
To us the path of knowledge show,
And teach us in her ways to go. Refrain

O come, o come, Thou Lord of might,
Who to thy tribes on Sinai’s height
In ancient times did give the law,
In cloud, and majesty, and awe. Refrain

O come, Thou Rod of Jesse’s stem,
From ev’ry foe deliver them
That trust Thy mighty power to save,
And give them vict’ry o’er the grave. Refrain

O come, Thou Key of David, come,
And open wide our heav’nly home,
Make safe the way that leads on high,
That we no more have cause to sigh. Refrain

O come, Thou Dayspring from on high,
And cheer us by thy drawing nigh;
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night
And death’s dark shadow put to flight. Refrain

O come, Desire of nations, bind
In one the hearts of all mankind;
Bid every strife and quarrel cease
And fill the world with heaven’s peace. Refrain

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On Hiatus

Posted on November 30, 2016 in Blogging

Due to upcoming deadlines, visiting the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, and the need to spend time with family over the holidays, my blog will be on hiatus until after the first of the year.

on-hiatus

See you then!!!

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Mom’s Bread Filling (Family Recipe Friday)

Posted on November 23, 2016 in Family Recipes, Uncategorized
Mom's Bread Filling

Mom’s Bread Filling

This is my mother’s recipe but I believe she got it from her mother, my grandmother. The women in this family have been making this filling every Thanksgiving for several generations. My maternal line is primarily Pennsylvania German contributing many excellent family recipes to my heritage. I love it. I also use this recipe for stuffed pork chops.

Once, cooked, it can be eaten hot or cold and tastes better the next day. That is why I make it the night before Thanksgiving to allow it to season overnight in the refrigerator. Normally, I would be making this recipe tonight in anticipation of tomorrow’s dinner for the entire family, which now numbers nineteen; but, a couple of years ago, I retired from preparing this dinner and now, either eat out or go to my son’s house. I do miss this filling…

I usually used sliced white bread, which I cut into cubes to make this filling but the last few times I made it, I used the bags of bread cubes. While still tasting fine, I noticed that the ready cubes do not blend together as well as the fresh bread cubes do.

I was taught to mix the bread cubes and dressing by hand, while it was still hot. This distributes the celery, onions and butter throughout the bread cubes much more thoroughly than using a mixing spoon.

Some like the wet filling straight from the turkey, but others like their filling on the dry side (myself included), so I always made more than would fit in the turkey. The remaining filling I placed into a large open-proof ceramic bowl and baked it in the oven.

This recipe makes around 20 to 26 servings, depending upon the serving size.

Mom’s Bread Filling

Ingredients

Amount    Measure       Ingredient
3                 cups              butter or margarine (three sticks)
4 ½           cups               chopped celery
2 ¼           cups               finely chopped onions
27              cups               soft bread cubes (about 3 loaves of sliced bread)
4 ½           teaspoons     dried parsley
4 ½           teaspoons     salt
1 ½            teaspoons    pepper

Directions

In a large bowl, layer bread cubes, parsley, salt and pepper.

Melt butter in skillet over medium-high heat. Cook celery and onion in butter, stirring occasionally, until tender; remove from heat.

Toss celery mixture and remaining ingredients in bowl. Use your hands or a large spoon. Let mixture refrigerate overnight to blend flavors.

Posted in Family Recipes, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Society Saturday – Preserving Family Photos, Keepsakes and Documents (UPDATE)

Posted on November 16, 2016 in Society Saturday

This is an important update to my earlier post that was published on Nov. 5th. Due to unforeseen circumstances, there has been a change in the society’s program for this coming Sunday, Nov. 20th.

Logo of the Carroll County Genealogical SocietyThis month the Carroll County Genealogical Society’s upcoming meeting, which will be held on Sunday, November 20, 2016 at 2:00 PM* , features Dottie Aleshire. Dottie is a native Marylander presently living in Ellicott City, Maryland. She teaches genealogy classes at Howard County Community College and the Glenwood Community Center in Howard County. She’s a long-time volunteer at the Family History Center in Ellicott City, Maryland. She has produced three personal family histories and three cemetery books for the Baltimore County Genealogical Society. She is presently Chair Person for Education and Programs for the Howard County Genealogical Society.

Dottie will be presenting Preserving Family Photos, Keepsakes and Documents. Whether you’ve decided to “downsize” or simply update your old software, your precious family photographs, keepsakes and genealogy records need to be given a second look. They need to be preserved for you and your family in the event of a disaster. You never know when a catastrophe will happen that causes your records to be lost forever. Take the time to make sure this doesn’t happen to you. It’s called “backup, backup, backup”!!! We’ll discuss some of your options.

Meetings of the Carroll County Genealogical Society (CCGS) are usually held the third Monday of each month, March through May and September through November, at 7:00 p.m. in the Dixon Room, Westminster Library at 50 East Main Street, Westminster.

*This month we have scheduled a special Sunday afternoon meeting. There will be no Monday night meeting. Refreshments are available at 2:00 p.m. and the meetings are free and open to the public.

Please come to our meeting and bring a friend. You will meet other folks interested in family research and genealogy and enjoy delightful talks that may help you in your own research.  I look forward to seeing new faces!

You can also come early and take advantage of our large collection of books and other materials housed at the Westminster Branch of the CCPL.  On Thursday afternoons, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m., one or more society volunteers will be on hand to assist researchers. Of course, this collection is available to all anytime the library is open.

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

 

 

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Tech Tuesday – Using SmartDraw for Genealogy

Posted on November 8, 2016 in Tech Tuesday

There is an interesting piece of software called SmartDraw that I’ve been using for several years. Prior to that I used Microsoft Visio to do my graphic flowcharts, workflows, images and various charts that I saved as JPG or PDF and used in my PowerPoint presentations, reports, etc.

Visio got very expensive so while looking for a replacement, I came across SmartDraw. It does about everything that Visio does but at a much lower cost. I became intrigued by this software not because of what it contains, but what it can do that Visio does not, especially in the realm of genealogy.

The Standard Edition of SmartDraw came with many more templates than Visio Standard. I can’t speak to how the SmartDraw templates compare to the templates provided in Visio Professional since I have never used that edition.

SmartDraw provides the following templates that can be used in genealogy:

• Forms/Family Forms:

o Correspondence Record Sheet
o Family Group Record
o Family Record Sheet
o Family Relationship Chart
o Generation Chart
o Individual Work Sheet
o Research Record Sheet (Research Log)

• Schedules & Calendars

o Timesheets

• Science & Education/Family Trees

o Various Examples

• Science & Education/Genograms

o Genogram Symbols
o Cross Family Genogram
o Family Relationship Genogram
o Various Examples

• Science & Education/Pedigree Chart

o Human Pedigree Chart
o Dog Pedigree Chart
o Feline Pedigree Chart
o Female Pedigree Chart

All of which can be filled out electronically and/or customized. It also has presentation templates. While it can prepare a presentation, it does not have all the presentation bells and whistles of PowerPoint. Presentation slides prepared in the Business Edition of SmartDraw can be exported to PowerPoint.

Other template categories include mind maps, decision trees, cluster word webs and numerous other templates that may be handy.  I am currently trying to figure out which ones I can leverage for doing cluster analysis (FAN analysis) for one of my brick walls.

This photo family tree is a sample of one of the templates provided in SmartDraw.

This photo family tree is a sample of one of the templates provided in SmartDraw.

 

The version of SmartDraw that I currently have is the 2016 Enterprise Edition. I began using SmartDraw in 2012 and in 2014, I began to subscribe annually to Platinum Support, so I receive all updates, upgrades and other benefits of this service.

SmartDraw can import from Visio (Enterprise Edition) so I can reuse all my old Visio graphics; and it can export to a wide variety of image formats and document formats, such as PDF, Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint (Business Edition).  The Enterprise Edition also allows import and export to MS Project. The price comparison chart below compares the listed retail price for the current versions of each of these products as obtained from their websites.

Price Comparison

Visio
SmartDraw

 

MS Visio Standard 2016 $299.99 SmartDraw Standard 2016 $197.00
MS Visio Professional 2010 $589.99 SmartDraw Business 2016 $297.00
    SmartDraw Enterprise 2016 $497.00
Visio Pro for Office 365 $13.00/mo. SmartDraw Platinum Support $69.95/yr.

 

The website at www.smartdraw.com  contains training videos and step-by-step instructions on how to create various types of visuals with SmartDraw.  They offer phone support Monday through Friday.  You may also contact them by email using the contact form on the site. There is a free trial version available.

 

NOTE: For full disclosure, I purchased my own copy of SmartDraw.  I am not an employee or affiliate of SmartDraw Software, LLC, and no one paid me to publish this information.

Posted in Tech Tuesday | 6 Comments

Society Saturday – Preserving Family Photos, Keepsakes and Documents (UPDATED)

Posted on November 5, 2016 in Society Saturday

This is an important update. Due to unforeseen circumstances, there has been a change in the society’s program for this coming Sunday.

Logo of the Carroll County Genealogical SocietyThis month the Carroll County Genealogical Society’s upcoming meeting, which will be held on Sunday, November 20, 2016 at 2:00 PM*, features Dottie Aleshire. Dottie is a native Marylander presently living in Ellicott City, Maryland. She teaches genealogy classes at Howard County Community College and the Glenwood Community Center in Howard County. She’s a long-time volunteer at the Family History Center in Ellicott City, Maryland. She has produced three personal family histories and three cemetery books for the Baltimore County Genealogical Society. She is presently Chair Person for Education and Programs for the Howard County Genealogical Society.

Dottie will be presenting Preserving Family Photos, Keepsakes and Documents. Whether you’ve decided to “downsize” or simply update your old software, your precious family photographs, keepsakes and genealogy records need to be given a second look. They need to be preserved for you and your family in the event of a disaster. You never know when a catastrophe will happen that causes your records to be lost forever. Take the time to make sure this doesn’t happen to you. It’s called “backup, backup, backup”!!! We’ll discuss some of your options.

Meetings of the Carroll County Genealogical Society (CCGS) are usually held the third Monday of each month, March through May and September through November, at 7:00 p.m. in the Dixon Room, Westminster Library at 50 East Main Street, Westminster.

*This month we have scheduled a special Sunday afternoon meeting. There will be no Monday night meeting. Refreshments are available at 2:00 p.m. and the meetings are free and open to the public.

Please come to our meeting and bring a friend. You will meet other folks interested in family research and genealogy and enjoy delightful talks that may help you in your own research. I look forward to seeing new faces!

You can also come early and take advantage of our large collection of books and other materials housed at the Westminster Branch of the CCPL. On Thursday afternoons, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m., one or more society volunteers will be on hand to assist researchers. Of course, this collection is available to all anytime the library is open.

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

 

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The Transitive Vampire

Posted on October 30, 2016 in Style Guides, Writing Tips

For my Halloween post, I want to discuss a little book that I came across recently as I was trying to find more space on a bookshelf. It sat snuggly between the Chicago Manual of Style and Strunk and White’s Elements of Style. The book is titled The Transitive Vampire: A Handbook of Grammar for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed by Karen Elizabeth Gordon. What does this have to do with genealogy? Well, as genealogists, we do a lot of writing, and I really love this book!

Transitive Vampire Cover 1984

Karen Elizabeth Gordon is no ordinary grammarian, and her works, including The Well-Tempered Sentence and the Disheveled Dictionary (both of which I own)–are no commonplace style books. The Transitive Vampire is inhabited by a motley cast of gargoyles, werewolves, nymphs, fauns, debutantes, mastodons, and, yes, vampires, who frolic and assemble to illustrate basic principles of grammar. The sentences are fascinating, “The Styrian String Quartet is a four-headed monster of catgut and mediocrity that shouldn’t be let out of its cage.”–but the rules and their explanations are as thorough as any you might find in Strunk and White.

The Transitive Vampire breathes new life into our old grammatical demons. In the words of Gordon’s introduction,

“Before I leave you in the embrace of the transitive vampire, I should introduce him to you…”

“…He had become one of night’s creatures, with a grammar he had received from the great and jagged unknown.”

Gordon’s language books are not complete references on the English language; there are far more comprehensive guides than these. The real value of Gordon’s book is that it makes you actually want to read through it like a fiction novel, and the grammar lessons are absorbed along the way.

Gordon published her original *Transitive Vampire* in 1984. This is the edition that I own. The newer edition, The Deluxe Transitive Vampire, published in 1993 is available on Amazon; as are the latest editions of her other grammar books, The New Well-Tempered Sentence and, The Disheveled Dictionary.

Full Disclosure: I am not an employee or affiliate of any bookseller or publisher. No one paid me to publish this information. Did I say I love this book?

 

 

Posted in Style Guides, Writing Tips | Leave a comment