On Hiatus

Posted on November 30, 2016 in Blogging

Due to upcoming deadlines, visiting the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, and the need to spend time with family over the holidays, my blog will be on hiatus until after the first of the year.

on-hiatus

See you then!!!

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Mom’s Bread Filling (Family Recipe Friday)

Posted on November 23, 2016 in Family Recipes, Uncategorized
Mom's Bread Filling

Mom’s Bread Filling

This is my mother’s recipe but I believe she got it from her mother, my grandmother. The women in this family have been making this filling every Thanksgiving for several generations. My maternal line is primarily Pennsylvania German contributing many excellent family recipes to my heritage. I love it. I also use this recipe for stuffed pork chops.

Once, cooked, it can be eaten hot or cold and tastes better the next day. That is why I make it the night before Thanksgiving to allow it to season overnight in the refrigerator. Normally, I would be making this recipe tonight in anticipation of tomorrow’s dinner for the entire family, which now numbers nineteen; but, a couple of years ago, I retired from preparing this dinner and now, either eat out or go to my son’s house. I do miss this filling…

I usually used sliced white bread, which I cut into cubes to make this filling but the last few times I made it, I used the bags of bread cubes. While still tasting fine, I noticed that the ready cubes do not blend together as well as the fresh bread cubes do.

I was taught to mix the bread cubes and dressing by hand, while it was still hot. This distributes the celery, onions and butter throughout the bread cubes much more thoroughly than using a mixing spoon.

Some like the wet filling straight from the turkey, but others like their filling on the dry side (myself included), so I always made more than would fit in the turkey. The remaining filling I placed into a large open-proof ceramic bowl and baked it in the oven.

This recipe makes around 20 to 26 servings, depending upon the serving size.

Mom’s Bread Filling

Ingredients

Amount    Measure       Ingredient
3                 cups              butter or margarine (three sticks)
4 ½           cups               chopped celery
2 ¼           cups               finely chopped onions
27              cups               soft bread cubes (about 3 loaves of sliced bread)
4 ½           teaspoons     dried parsley
4 ½           teaspoons     salt
1 ½            teaspoons    pepper

Directions

In a large bowl, layer bread cubes, parsley, salt and pepper.

Melt butter in skillet over medium-high heat. Cook celery and onion in butter, stirring occasionally, until tender; remove from heat.

Toss celery mixture and remaining ingredients in bowl. Use your hands or a large spoon. Let mixture refrigerate overnight to blend flavors.

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Society Saturday – Preserving Family Photos, Keepsakes and Documents (UPDATE)

Posted on November 16, 2016 in Society Saturday

This is an important update to my earlier post that was published on Nov. 5th. Due to unforeseen circumstances, there has been a change in the society’s program for this coming Sunday, Nov. 20th.

Logo of the Carroll County Genealogical SocietyThis month the Carroll County Genealogical Society’s upcoming meeting, which will be held on Sunday, November 20, 2016 at 2:00 PM* , features Dottie Aleshire. Dottie is a native Marylander presently living in Ellicott City, Maryland. She teaches genealogy classes at Howard County Community College and the Glenwood Community Center in Howard County. She’s a long-time volunteer at the Family History Center in Ellicott City, Maryland. She has produced three personal family histories and three cemetery books for the Baltimore County Genealogical Society. She is presently Chair Person for Education and Programs for the Howard County Genealogical Society.

Dottie will be presenting Preserving Family Photos, Keepsakes and Documents. Whether you’ve decided to “downsize” or simply update your old software, your precious family photographs, keepsakes and genealogy records need to be given a second look. They need to be preserved for you and your family in the event of a disaster. You never know when a catastrophe will happen that causes your records to be lost forever. Take the time to make sure this doesn’t happen to you. It’s called “backup, backup, backup”!!! We’ll discuss some of your options.

Meetings of the Carroll County Genealogical Society (CCGS) are usually held the third Monday of each month, March through May and September through November, at 7:00 p.m. in the Dixon Room, Westminster Library at 50 East Main Street, Westminster.

*This month we have scheduled a special Sunday afternoon meeting. There will be no Monday night meeting. Refreshments are available at 2:00 p.m. and the meetings are free and open to the public.

Please come to our meeting and bring a friend. You will meet other folks interested in family research and genealogy and enjoy delightful talks that may help you in your own research.  I look forward to seeing new faces!

You can also come early and take advantage of our large collection of books and other materials housed at the Westminster Branch of the CCPL.  On Thursday afternoons, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m., one or more society volunteers will be on hand to assist researchers. Of course, this collection is available to all anytime the library is open.

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

 

 

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Tech Tuesday – Using SmartDraw for Genealogy

Posted on November 8, 2016 in Tech Tuesday

There is an interesting piece of software called SmartDraw that I’ve been using for several years. Prior to that I used Microsoft Visio to do my graphic flowcharts, workflows, images and various charts that I saved as JPG or PDF and used in my PowerPoint presentations, reports, etc.

Visio got very expensive so while looking for a replacement, I came across SmartDraw. It does about everything that Visio does but at a much lower cost. I became intrigued by this software not because of what it contains, but what it can do that Visio does not, especially in the realm of genealogy.

The Standard Edition of SmartDraw came with many more templates than Visio Standard. I can’t speak to how the SmartDraw templates compare to the templates provided in Visio Professional since I have never used that edition.

SmartDraw provides the following templates that can be used in genealogy:

• Forms/Family Forms:

o Correspondence Record Sheet
o Family Group Record
o Family Record Sheet
o Family Relationship Chart
o Generation Chart
o Individual Work Sheet
o Research Record Sheet (Research Log)

• Schedules & Calendars

o Timesheets

• Science & Education/Family Trees

o Various Examples

• Science & Education/Genograms

o Genogram Symbols
o Cross Family Genogram
o Family Relationship Genogram
o Various Examples

• Science & Education/Pedigree Chart

o Human Pedigree Chart
o Dog Pedigree Chart
o Feline Pedigree Chart
o Female Pedigree Chart

All of which can be filled out electronically and/or customized. It also has presentation templates. While it can prepare a presentation, it does not have all the presentation bells and whistles of PowerPoint. Presentation slides prepared in the Business Edition of SmartDraw can be exported to PowerPoint.

Other template categories include mind maps, decision trees, cluster word webs and numerous other templates that may be handy.  I am currently trying to figure out which ones I can leverage for doing cluster analysis (FAN analysis) for one of my brick walls.

This photo family tree is a sample of one of the templates provided in SmartDraw.

This photo family tree is a sample of one of the templates provided in SmartDraw.

 

The version of SmartDraw that I currently have is the 2016 Enterprise Edition. I began using SmartDraw in 2012 and in 2014, I began to subscribe annually to Platinum Support, so I receive all updates, upgrades and other benefits of this service.

SmartDraw can import from Visio (Enterprise Edition) so I can reuse all my old Visio graphics; and it can export to a wide variety of image formats and document formats, such as PDF, Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint (Business Edition).  The Enterprise Edition also allows import and export to MS Project. The price comparison chart below compares the listed retail price for the current versions of each of these products as obtained from their websites.

Price Comparison

Visio
SmartDraw

 

MS Visio Standard 2016 $299.99 SmartDraw Standard 2016 $197.00
MS Visio Professional 2010 $589.99 SmartDraw Business 2016 $297.00
    SmartDraw Enterprise 2016 $497.00
Visio Pro for Office 365 $13.00/mo. SmartDraw Platinum Support $69.95/yr.

 

The website at www.smartdraw.com  contains training videos and step-by-step instructions on how to create various types of visuals with SmartDraw.  They offer phone support Monday through Friday.  You may also contact them by email using the contact form on the site. There is a free trial version available.

 

NOTE: For full disclosure, I purchased my own copy of SmartDraw.  I am not an employee or affiliate of SmartDraw Software, LLC, and no one paid me to publish this information.

Posted in Tech Tuesday | 6 Comments

Society Saturday – Preserving Family Photos, Keepsakes and Documents (UPDATED)

Posted on November 5, 2016 in Society Saturday

This is an important update. Due to unforeseen circumstances, there has been a change in the society’s program for this coming Sunday.

Logo of the Carroll County Genealogical SocietyThis month the Carroll County Genealogical Society’s upcoming meeting, which will be held on Sunday, November 20, 2016 at 2:00 PM*, features Dottie Aleshire. Dottie is a native Marylander presently living in Ellicott City, Maryland. She teaches genealogy classes at Howard County Community College and the Glenwood Community Center in Howard County. She’s a long-time volunteer at the Family History Center in Ellicott City, Maryland. She has produced three personal family histories and three cemetery books for the Baltimore County Genealogical Society. She is presently Chair Person for Education and Programs for the Howard County Genealogical Society.

Dottie will be presenting Preserving Family Photos, Keepsakes and Documents. Whether you’ve decided to “downsize” or simply update your old software, your precious family photographs, keepsakes and genealogy records need to be given a second look. They need to be preserved for you and your family in the event of a disaster. You never know when a catastrophe will happen that causes your records to be lost forever. Take the time to make sure this doesn’t happen to you. It’s called “backup, backup, backup”!!! We’ll discuss some of your options.

Meetings of the Carroll County Genealogical Society (CCGS) are usually held the third Monday of each month, March through May and September through November, at 7:00 p.m. in the Dixon Room, Westminster Library at 50 East Main Street, Westminster.

*This month we have scheduled a special Sunday afternoon meeting. There will be no Monday night meeting. Refreshments are available at 2:00 p.m. and the meetings are free and open to the public.

Please come to our meeting and bring a friend. You will meet other folks interested in family research and genealogy and enjoy delightful talks that may help you in your own research. I look forward to seeing new faces!

You can also come early and take advantage of our large collection of books and other materials housed at the Westminster Branch of the CCPL. On Thursday afternoons, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m., one or more society volunteers will be on hand to assist researchers. Of course, this collection is available to all anytime the library is open.

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

 

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The Transitive Vampire

Posted on October 30, 2016 in Style Guides, Writing Tips

For my Halloween post, I want to discuss a little book that I came across recently as I was trying to find more space on a bookshelf. It sat snuggly between the Chicago Manual of Style and Strunk and White’s Elements of Style. The book is titled The Transitive Vampire: A Handbook of Grammar for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed by Karen Elizabeth Gordon. What does this have to do with genealogy? Well, as genealogists, we do a lot of writing, and I really love this book!

Transitive Vampire Cover 1984

Karen Elizabeth Gordon is no ordinary grammarian, and her works, including The Well-Tempered Sentence and the Disheveled Dictionary (both of which I own)–are no commonplace style books. The Transitive Vampire is inhabited by a motley cast of gargoyles, werewolves, nymphs, fauns, debutantes, mastodons, and, yes, vampires, who frolic and assemble to illustrate basic principles of grammar. The sentences are fascinating, “The Styrian String Quartet is a four-headed monster of catgut and mediocrity that shouldn’t be let out of its cage.”–but the rules and their explanations are as thorough as any you might find in Strunk and White.

The Transitive Vampire breathes new life into our old grammatical demons. In the words of Gordon’s introduction,

“Before I leave you in the embrace of the transitive vampire, I should introduce him to you…”

“…He had become one of night’s creatures, with a grammar he had received from the great and jagged unknown.”

Gordon’s language books are not complete references on the English language; there are far more comprehensive guides than these. The real value of Gordon’s book is that it makes you actually want to read through it like a fiction novel, and the grammar lessons are absorbed along the way.

Gordon published her original *Transitive Vampire* in 1984. This is the edition that I own. The newer edition, The Deluxe Transitive Vampire, published in 1993 is available on Amazon; as are the latest editions of her other grammar books, The New Well-Tempered Sentence and, The Disheveled Dictionary.

Full Disclosure: I am not an employee or affiliate of any bookseller or publisher. No one paid me to publish this information. Did I say I love this book?

 

 

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Tech Tuesday – Using Transcript for Transcribing Documents

Posted on October 18, 2016 in Tech Tuesday

Transcript a little tool, developed by Jacob Boerema, that helps you transcribe text from digital media. Back in 2011, I had just accepted a job to transcribe 52 early deeds so I began looking for something that might make the job, if not easy, at least easier—and I discovered Transcript.

I really love this little gem. I was scanning the deeds in as both TIF and PDF images and Transcript could open both. I could make the image fairly large and even magnify a letter, if needed. The software allowed me to take my transcribed file (in RTF format) and open in MS Word or any other text editor that supports RTF to finish it. Transcript has too many features to enumerate here but the website has all the details.

The current version offers two editions: Basic, which is free for personal use only, and Pro, which costs 15 Euros (~ $27.17 USD) for all other usages. Once I found out that it really increased my productivity, I purchased the Pro version since I was using it for commercial not personal use.

Transcript is for Windows but supposedly will work on a MacBook Air running Crossover; also on Macs running Wine or Parallels. Now what I would like to do is show you the before and after of one of the deeds I transcribed using this product. The following is an image of the document I received.

Copy of Frederick Co., MD court recording of original land grant for Beaver Dam Levell

Copy of Frederick Co., MD court recording of original land grant for Beaver Dam Levell

 

And this is an image of the its final transcription. The original document was transcribed using Transcript, saved in RTF format, then opened in Word where all the fancy finishing touches were applied.

Transcription of the Beaver Dam Levell grant shown above

Transcription of the Beaver Dam Levell grant shown above

 

 

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Genealogy at the Library – Online!

Posted on October 11, 2016 in Maryland Research Tips

In Maryland there are twenty-four public library systems, one in each county and Baltimore City. All of these libraries offer wireless access, public use computers, research databases, and access to Sailor.

home-page-of-sailor-system-md-sm

Sailor is an online public information network that connects Marylanders and their libraries to resources within the state. It is available free through every library and from home computers with Internet access. Of interest to genealogists, Sailor provides access to HeritageQuest Online, databases that provide indexed, digital documents for tracing your family history; and to the History Reference Center, a collection of historical documents, biographies, reference books, photos, maps and historical videos. A valid Maryland library card is required to access these resources.

In addition to Sailor, many individual county and city libraries subscribe to additional databases available only from their site. Some of these research databases can be accessed only by going to your local library; others can be accessed online from your home.

Most of the county libraries and that of Baltimore City provide onsite only access to the library edition of Ancestry.com. Some examples of the different databases offered by some libraries are:

  • Carroll County Public Library offers searchable access to the Carroll County Times from 1933 through 2014 from home or onsite.
  • Enoch Pratt free Library (Baltimore City) offers: America’s Obituaries and Death Notices, the Biography and Genealogy Master Index (BGMI), and the Sanborn Maps (Digital) – Maryland, which can all be accessed either onsite or from home.
  • Searchable editions of the Baltimore Sun from 1837 to 1990 are offered by Enoch Pratt and Baltimore County libraries, again searchable from home.

The above selection of databases are just examples. Some of these databases may also be offered in other counties along with databases not listed here.

You may ask “why do I care what databases are held in other library systems in Maryland, when I live, for example, in Carroll County?” Maryland residents may register with and borrow materials from any public library in the State. This is a great benefit to residents of Maryland. With authorization to other library systems, you can access databases that your local library does not have.

I currently have access to Carroll County, Baltimore County and Enoch Pratt library systems. Here is what I had to do to get authorized to access Baltimore County and Enoch Pratt. First, to access databases from other library systems, you must have a valid library card from one of the library systems. I already had my Carroll County card. You then go, in person, to a branch of the library that you wish to get access. They will authorize your current card to access to their system.

In Baltimore County, I had to create an account online to access their databases. For Carroll and Pratt, I had to get a password authorized and then I can use the barcode from my library card and the password to access the information. I would imagine that each library system has similar requirements. Enoch Pratt requires me to show up in person once a year to renew my authorization. Out-of-state residents can acquire a Maryland library card by paying an annual fee. Many of the local library systems issue out-of-state library cards.

While this post focuses on Maryland, I am sure other states must offer similar opportunities. Are you taking advantage of the online research databases offered by your local library?

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Family Recipe Friday – Alberta Zebley’s Chocolate Chip Cookies

Posted on October 7, 2016 in Family Recipes, Uncategorized

My best friend in high school, Alberta Zebley, taught me to make these cookies. Her mom taught her. We used to make them together all the time in the kitchen of her home. I hung out there quite a bit and her family was lovely to me. After graduation, we lost touch, but I still make these cookies. My husband loves them, too.

This recipe makes around 4 dozen cookies, depending upon their size.

Alberta Zebley’s Chocolate Chip Cookies

alberta-zebleys-chocolate-chip-cookies-fr

Ingredients

1/2 cup butter
1 cup packed dark brown sugar
1 whole egg, large
2 cups biscuit mix (Bisquick)
6 ounces semisweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup chopped nuts (optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 F.

Mix butter, brown sugar and egg. Stir in biscuit mix, nuts and chocolate chips.

Drop dough by rounded teaspoonful about 2 inches apart on ungreased baking sheet.

Bake about 10 minutes until lightly browned.

 

Posted in Family Recipes, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Genealogy Mysteries 2016 – The Latest Discoveries

Posted on September 29, 2016 in Genealogy Mysteries

Genealogy Mysteries sm txt

 

the-spyglass-fileOn September 1, 2016, Nathan Dylan Goodwin released his latest Morton Farrier, Forensic Genealogist book, The Spyglass File. In this, his fourth book, a new case plunges us into the middle of the Battle of Britain. Between his approaching nuptials and his personal research for his biological father, he must focus on the case, which is connected to a secret document from WWII known as the Spyglass File. Definitely a page turner and the best Morton Farrier yet.

Since initial posts on this topic over the years, I have been accumulating and reading new books, authors, and series in this sub-genre. It seems this sub-genre is really taking off. For those of you who also enjoy genealogy and reading mysteries, this is my comprehensive list of all genealogy mysteries that I have discovered to date and contains any new books I have discovered since I published this post in March 2016.

The Latest Discoveries

A new series from Cynthia Raleigh featuring amateur genealogist, Perri Seamore.

• Poison Branches (2016) – Kindle
• Buried Roots (2016) – Kindle

Another new series features a family tree full of witches, some ghosts, and the occult, with Anna Denning, a professional genealogist determined to find the truth.

• The Witch Tree (2011) – Kindle
• Sparrow House (2012) – Kindle
• The Sacrifice (2014) – Kindle
• The Club (2015) – Kindle

The Irish Inheritance is the first of a new series by M J Lee, starring former police detective now genealogical investigator, Jayne Sinclair. It takes us through the Easter Rising of 1916 and the Irish War of Independence. Kindle edition

Series Family History Mysteries

The Nick Herald series by Jimmy Fox features a professional genealogist in New Orleans, Louisiana

• Deadly Pedigree (2001) – Kindle
• Lineages and Lies (2002) – Kindle
• Jackpot Blood (2014) – Kindle

The Danny O’Flaherty series by Jonathan Harrington stars an American teacher researching his family’s roots in Ireland and New York City.

• The Death of Cousin Rose (1996) – Paperback
• The Second Sorrowful Mystery (1999) – Paperback
• A Great Day for Dying (2001) – Paperback

The Lottie Albright series by Charlotte Hinger features a historian and editor for the county historical society in a small town in Western Kansas.

• Deadly Descent (2009) – Kindle
• Lethal Lineage (2011) – Kindle
• Hidden Heritage (2013) – Kindle

The Demary Jones series by E. L. Larkin (deceased) is set in Seattle, Washington, with Demary as the owner of Confidential Research, specializing in genealogy and historical research.

• Hear My Cry (1997) – Hardcover
• Hear Me Die (1998) – Hardcover
• Die and Die (1998) – Paperback
• Dead Men Die (1999) – Hardcover
• The Swallow Murders (1999) – Hardcover
• Die in Texas (2002) – Hardcover

Victory (Torie) O’Shea, a genealogist in New Kassel, Missouri, is ably portrayed in a series by Rett MacPherson. Now all available in Kindle editions.

• Family Skeletons (2014) – Kindle
• A Veiled Antiquity (2013) – Kindle
• A Comedy of Heirs (2014) – Kindle
• A Misty Mourning (2000) – Kindle
• Killing Cousins (2002) – Kindle
• Blood Relations (2014) – Kindle
• In Sheep’s Clothing (2014) – Kindle
• Thicker Than Water (2005) – Kindle
• Dead Man Running (2006) – Kindle
• Died in the Wool (2014) – Kindle
• The Blood Ballad (2014) – Kindle

Natasha Blake, a genealogist in the Cotswolds in England appears in the series by Fiona Mountain.

• Pale as the Dead (2004) – Kindle
• Bloodline (2015) – Kindle

Fay Sampson is the author of the Suzie Fewings books a series about a genealogist discovering interesting secrets in her family history in England.

• In the Blood (2009) – Paperback
• A Malignant House (2010) – Paperback
• Those in Peril (2010) – Paperback
• Father Unknown (2011) – Kindle
• The Overlooker (2012) – Kindle
• Beneath the Soil (2014) – Kindle

The Family Tree mysteries by Patricia Sprinkle feature Katherine Murray as an amateur genealogist who finds strange events in the past.

• Death on the Family Tree (2007) – Kindle
• Sins of the Fathers (2007) – Paperback
• Daughter of Deceit (2008) – Kindle

Mort Sinclair, a respected genealogist and lawyer on Fogge Island off the New England coast, stars in a series by Gene Stratton. Gene Stratton, a much-traveled former CIA case officer, is a well-known genealogist who has had two prior books published: Plymouth Colony and Applied Genealogy.

• Killing Cousins (1999) – Hardcover
• Cornish Conundrum (2000) – Kindle

The Nigel Barnes series by Dan Waddell concerns a professional genealogist who assists the police, mainly Detective Chief Inspector Grant Foster in London, England.

• The Blood Detective (2008) – Hardcover
• Blood Atonement (2009) – Hardcover

The Jefferson Tayte mysteries by Steve Robinson feature a professional genealogist who ferrets out family secrets and old mysteries using genealogy research primarily in the UK. This series is a page-turner and keeps getting better and better.

• In the Blood (2011) – Kindle
• To the Grave (2012) – Kindle
• The Last Queen of England (2012) – Kindle
• The Lost Empress (2014) – Kindle
• Kindred (2016) – Kindle

Patrick Day’s new series starring Anna Fitzgerald, a career detective with the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office Investigative Division, who becomes entangled with genealogy to trace old coins in this first book of the series.

• Murders and Genealogy in Hennepin County (2012) – Kindle

Simon Shaw, professor of history and “forensic historian” in Raleigh, North Carolina, in a series by Sarah R. Shaber, uses his expertise in historical and genealogical research to help solve murders that have their roots in the past.

• Simon Said (1997) – Kindle
• Snipe Hunt (2000) – Kindle
• The Fugitive King (2002) – Kindle
• The Bug Funeral (2004) – Kindle
• Shell Game (2007) – Kindle

The Alex & Briggie mysteries by G. G. Vandagriff, team up a spunky young widow and her rifle-toting grandmother, who run a genealogy research business called RootSearch, Inc. that seems to specialize in solving murders.

• Cankered Roots (2011) – Kindle
• Of Deadly Descent (2011) – Kindle
• Tangled Roots (2011) – Kindle
• Poisoned Pedigree (2012) – Kindle
• The Hidden Branch (2011) – Kindle

In the Morton Farrier, Forensic Genealogist series by Nathan Dylan Goodwin, we discover a stubborn, determined man who uses whatever means necessary to uncover the past. Great start of a new series.

• Hiding the Past (2013) – Kindle
• The Lost Ancestor (2014) – Kindle
• The Orange Lilies: A Morton Farrier novella (2014) – Kindle
• The America Ground (2015) – Kindle
• The Spyglass File (2016) – Kindle

These books by John Nixon star family historian, Madeleine Porter. While not mysteries as we think of them, they take us through the experiences of our amateur “detectives” unraveling the “mysteries” that surround them.

• Family Shadows (2014) – Kindle
• The Cuckoo Clock (2014) – Kindle
• Stolen Futures (2014) – Kindle
• Another Summer (2014) – Kindle
• The Cost of Silence (2015) – Kindle

The Museum Mysteries by Sheila Connolly star Nell Pratt, president of the Pennsylvania Antiquarian Society (think Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia) who spends much of her time solving murders through research in their collections. These books are fascinating for their mysteries, their history, and our glimpses into the lives of the archivists. Highly recommended.

• Fundraising the Dead (2010) – Kindle
• Let’s Play Dead (2011) – Kindle
• Fire Engine Dead (2012) – Kindle
• Monument to the Dead (2013) – Kindle
• Razing the Dead (2014) – Kindle
• Privy to the Dead (2015) – Kindle
• Dead End Street (2016) – Kindle

In the Family History Mysteries by Brynn Bonner, genealogist Sophreena McClure is an expert at unearthing other people’s secrets. Using old documents and photographs, Soph and her business partner, Esme Sabatier—also a gifted medium—trace family histories and create heritage scrapbooks.

• Paging the Dead (2013) – Kindle
• Death in Reel Time (2014) – Kindle
• Picture Them Dead (2015) – Kindle
• Dead in a Flash (2016) – Kindle

Geraldine Wall writes about probate researcher Anna Ames in this trilogy. These are mystery thrillers and we are drawn in to Anna’s family, life and work.

• File Under Fear (2014) – Kindle
• File Under Family (2014) – Kindle
• File Under Fidelity (2015) – Kindle

This is the first book in a supernatural genealogy detective series called Maze Investigations by M.K. Jones featuring Maggie Gilbert, set in Newport, South Wales, drawing on real historical details.

• Three Times Removed (2015) – Kindle

If you like your genealogy mysteries with a little humor, see the series starring Ben Bones, Genealogical Consultant and self-described Articulator of Family Skeletons written by Michael Havelin.

• Ben Bones and The Galleon of Gold (2013) – Kindle
• Ben Bones and the Search for Paneta’s Crown (2012) – Kindle
• Ben Bones and the Deadly Descendants (2013) – Kindle
• Ben Bones and the Conventional Murders (2015) – Kindle

Esme Quentin solves mysteries using genealogy in the West Midlands and in Devon in the books by Wendy Percival.

• Blood-Tied (2013) – Kindle
• The Indelible Stain (2014) – Kindle

Non-Series Family History Mysteries

Thomas McKerley and Ingrid Schippers, in their first genealogy mystery, Bloodlines – Touch Not the Cat (2012), introduce Cathy Macpherson, who uncovers her own and her husband’s past. Hope this becomes a series. Kindle edition.

The Marriage Certificate by Stephen Molineux (2013) stars Peter Sefton, amateur family historian. Not quite a mystery but certainly a detective story. Kindle edition.

In Silent Legacy: Discovering Family Secrets by Diana Church (2014) some German immigration history with new finds from a research trip helps Ellen O’Donnell solve a long-standing family mystery. Kindle edition.

In Finding Eliza by Stephanie Pitcher Fishman (2014), an old diary leads Lizzie Clydell down a dusty road of lies, hidden family secrets, and a lynching that nearly destroyed her family. I loved the quote “It’s just a little family history. What could go wrong?” Kindle edition.

Where’s Merrill? a genealogical thriller by Gearoid O’Neary (2013) is based upon real life historical events. The story unravels as Irish genealogist, Jed, researches his client’s mysterious maternal ancestry. Kindle edition.

Benjamin’s Ghosts: An Enid Gilchrist Mystery by Sylvia A. Nash (2014) is a cozy genealogy murder mystery set in West Tennessee. This is the start of a promising series. I hope we hear more from this author. Kindle edition.

In the Tainted Tree by Jacquelynn Luben (2013), Addie Russell inherits a house in Surrey and begins researching her English family Her research takes her back three generations to the First World War.

A century-old key may unlock the ancestral secrets of four families in The Fourth Descendant by Allison Maruska (2015).

While not a series, these genealogical mysteries by Norma Elizabeth Rawlings focus on how researching their ancestors became a life changing experience for each central character.

• Sleeping Dogs (2012) – Kindle
• Sleeping Dogs II (2013) – Kindle
• Malvern Murders (2013) – Kindle
• In the Genes (2013) – Kindle

Package from The Past by Jacqueline Opresnik is a search for a missing heir and family fortune set against the historical events of the Boer War and World War II.

Of course, for non-fiction fans there is Only A Few Bones: A True Account of the Rolling Fork Tragedy and Its Aftermath by John Philip Colletta. This is an outstanding read.

All of the books mentioned here are available in the editions specified and can be found at Amazon.com. Many of the Kindle editions are also available in paperback and/or hardcover.

If I’ve missed any of your favorites, please let me know in the comments. I am trying to make this list as complete as possible.

In 2012, I published my first Genealogy Mysteries post, which was titled Genealogy Mysteries. It provided a summary of the genealogy mysteries I discovered at that time. In 2014, I published Genealogy Mysteries – Expanded and in 2015, I published Genealogy Mysteries – Expanded and Updated and More Genealogy Mysteries. All books mentioned in these posts are now consolidated within the current post.

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