Frank Brown of South Carroll – Carroll’s Only Maryland Governor

Posted on February 9, 2016 in Family History, Interesting Finds

Ancestors of Frank Brown sm

Frank Brown (August 8, 1846 – February 3, 1920), the 42nd Governor of Maryland from 1892 to 1896. was born in 1846 in Sykesville, Maryland. He was a member of the United States Democratic Party. He also served as a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from 1876 to 1878.

Brown was first employed by the R. Sinclair & Co. and from 1870-1875, clerked in the State tobacco warehouse. He became the President of the Maryland State Agricultural & Mechanical Society in 1880. Then from 1886-1890, he served as Postmaster of Baltimore. For the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893, Brown was the President of the Board of Managers in Maryland. Later in life, he served as the President of the Baltimore Traction Company.

Brown inherited a large tract from his father, in Carroll County, known as  “Brown’s Inheritance”. He later purchased “Springfield”, an adjoining farm. After his term as governor, He sold both properties to the State of Maryland. This property eventually became the site of the Springfield Hospital.

In 1892, Brown was elected to his highest political position as Governor of Maryland, serving four years. His other political positions included Campaign Treasurer of the Democratic State Central Committee (1885), Campaign Manager for both Thomas G. Hayes for mayor of Baltimore (1899) and J. Barry Mahool for mayor of Baltimore (1906). His final position was City Collector for Baltimore in 1907.

He died in 1920 and is buried in the Greenmount Cemetery, located in Baltimore, Maryland.

 

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My FTM Transition Project – Update!

Posted on February 5, 2016 in Genealogical Technology

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It has been a surprising week! In December, Ancestry stunned us with the announcement that they are retiring Family Tree Maker. This week, they staggered us with their new announcement of two options for desktop software that will work with Ancestry.

The first option is that Software MacKiev has agreed to publish future versions of Family Tree Maker so its life will not terminate at the end of 2016. Family Tree Maker has risen from the dead.

The second option is an agreement between Ancestry and RootsMagic to connect Ancestry with their software by the end of 2016. Folks who desire to synchronize their databases with Ancestry now have two choices.

At first blush, it seems that all my problems are solved. I just continue to use FTM 2014 and await the next upgrade. While I love my Family Tree Maker software, this transitioning exercise has whetted my curiosity about the other software products. Maybe there is alternative desktop software that I would like better than FTM or maybe not; but if I don’t look, I will never know.

I have decided to complete the implementation of my plan to transition from FTM only I will now include FTM as one of my alternatives. I am very curious as to what I will learn.

On with Phase 1.I am continuing to work on the activity identify and fix all data errors in the current database. Please see my post “Tech Tuesday – FTM Transition Implementation: Phase 1 How to Identify & Fix Potential GEDCOM Errors” for more details about this activity.

Friday, January 29, 2016
Continuing with the issues in Keith’s post, I next corrected Address. According to Keith, Address should be stored as separate fields (street address, city, state, etc) within FTM, which it is not. Therefore, it cannot be corrected within FTM. I took his suggestion, copied, and pasted my address into the Note for the fact/event associated with it. If there was no event, I stored it in the person note. I did the same with Email, Phone Number and Web Address. I am not doing anything to Race since all the programs appear to import it correctly.

I copied all Tasks to the Note for the person and exported all my Saved Publications. I don’t have any person Web Links so no issue.

The decision to fix or not and the amount of effort required is more complex with the remaining items of Multimedia and Sources. In my next session, I will decide how to handle the Multimedia issues of Date, Description, and Text Field.

These posts may not appear weekly since I may be using much of the Friday morning time just doing the corrections, which may be time consuming and boring to write about. We shall see…

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Tech Tuesday – FTM Transition Implementation: Phase 1 How to Identify & Fix Potential GEDCOM Errors

Posted on January 26, 2016 in Genealogical Technology, Tech Tuesday

Phase 1 of my transition plan encompasses identifying my requirements both mandatory and optional, addressing cleaning up my database and preparing my data for import into my selected evaluation programs. I have decided to devote Friday mornings to completing all the activities required by my plan and will try to report on them the following Tuesday as a “Tech Tuesday” post.

I have added one more “nice to have” requirement to my Requirements Checklist—the ability to create a web page. At this point, my prioritized requirements are as complete as I can make them so it is time for me to move on to the next activity.

The next activity in Phase 1 is to identify and fix all data errors in the current database. Based on some suggestions from Russ Worthington of Family Tree Maker User, I have decided that data cleanup will be a before and after activity for me. During this phase, I will try to clean those items that may severely affect my data being transferred into a new program. I want to minimize data loss, although I will be able to add any data that did not transfer, manually as I will retain my original FTM database and GEDCOM.

I will clean up everything else after I transition to my selected program. Russ’s recommendation to use the cleanup activity in the new program as a way of learning how to use the program is an excellent one.

I broke the Phase 1 cleanup activity into smaller more specific tasks as follows:

  1. Review the post How to Scrub Your Data by Keith of Genealogy Tools for suggestions on how to create a clean GEDCOM
  2. Backup my database with new name before each change so I can revert to any prior version
  3. Insure that I have downloaded or moved a copy of all my images and documents into the FTM Media folder
  4. Fix all broken links
  5. Review all citations and correct if needed
  6. Export the FTM file both as FTM 2008/2009 and as GEDCOM 5.5 and name them Souza-Furlani Family FTM
  7. Run the GEDCOM file through FT Analyzer to check for data errors and repair, if needed

Friday, January 22, 2016
My first task was my review of Keith’s post. The major issues that he noted for me are: Also Known As, Address (including Email, Phone Number, and Web Address), Multimedia Description, and Sources. Please see his post for recommendations on how to deal with each of these issues. Based upon what data you have and how you entered it, the option you  choose may be unique to your situation.

I use FTM 2014 for Windows. I found, what for me, is a simple way of determining what individuals in your database are affected by the problem. I knew that I had used the Also Known As fact/event in FTM but I did not remember where I used it. From the People tab In FTM, I selected Publish, then Person Reports. I then selected the List of Individuals Report and:

  1. I changed the Title to “Individuals with an AKA Fact Needing Correction” (no quotes).
  2. Next I under Individuals to Include, I clicked on “Selected Individuals”.
  3. In the pop-up window, I clicked on Filter In.
  4. For the Filter by Individuals By Criteria, I chose “All Facts”, in the Search Where I selected “Also Known As”, “Contains”, “Any Data”. The box that displayed “Contains” changes to “Exists”. Click OK.
  5. Click OK again and your list is produced. I printed off my list since I like to be able to cross-off the ones I have fixed.
List of Selected Individuals Report

List of Selected Individuals Report

I found this approach a little easier than the one suggested by Keith but this may just be the difference between the MAC version (which I believe he uses) and the Windows version. The List of Individuals Report can be used for finding any data item that you need to correct during this activity.

I decided to take Keith’s advice and use a custom fact to handle my Also Known As issue. I created the custom fact AKA and fixed all my Also Known As individuals.

In my next session, I will decide how to handle the Address issue and begin correcting those individuals. I have 24 individuals where I specifically used the Address fact in FTM. Almost everyone in my database does use the Residence fact but so far, I have not seen anything that indicates that I need to correct the Residence fact unless I need to incorporate my address data. We shall see…

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Accolades for Michael Brophy and “Snagit Software for Genealogists”

Posted on January 23, 2016 in Genealogical Technology, Genealogy Education

Recently, I had the pleasure of attending Michael Brophy’s webinar “Snagit Software for Genealogists” sponsored by the Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series.

Michael is extremely knowledgeable about TechSmith’s Snagit, which is much more than a screen capture program; and he provides us with an understanding of its many uses for genealogy. Michael has presented this lecture both online and onsite at various societies.

If you get a chance to attend this lecture, I highly recommend it. Those of you who subscribe to the Legacy webinar series can find it in the webinar library.

Michael Brophy is a genealogist in the Boston area who provides general research in lineage and family history with a specialty in Irish-American ancestry. You can learn more about Michael and his work on his website “Brophy Professional Genealogy & Heir Tracing”.

Created by Eileen Souza of Old Bones Genealogy using the Snagit Editor

Created by Eileen Souza of Old Bones Genealogy using the Snagit Editor

 

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Tech Tuesday – FTM Transition Implementation: Phase 1 Determine Requirements

Posted on January 19, 2016 in Genealogical Technology, Tech Tuesday

Phase 1 of my transition plan encompasses identifying my requirements both mandatory and optional, addressing cleaning up my database and preparing my data for import into my selected evaluation programs. I have decided to devote Friday mornings to completing all the activities required by my plan and will try to report on them the following Tuesday as a “Tech Tuesday” post.

The first activity in Phase 1 is to determine and document my requirements. I broke this activity into smaller more specific tasks as follows:

  1. List all current features of FTM 2014 and format as a checklist – complete
  2. Update list with personal and additional requirements – initial draft complete
  3. Establish priority categories (e.g., Mandatory, Nice to Have, etc.) – complete
  4. Finalize list and prioritize – in progress

Friday, January 15, 2016
My goal for this activity is to create a checklist of requirements that I can use to document each program I test. I switched from my original idea of using a spreadsheet to a Word document since in Word I can easily actually add real check boxes that I can electronically check off. I headed the checklist to include the evaluation program name and date(s) of my evaluation. I decided to use as my baseline the product features from the FTM website, adding a check box to each feature in my final checklist. This task is complete.

I updated the baseline with my additional requirements that were not addressed in a simple feature list. This checklist is a first draft of my requirements so there may be further additions and/or modifications.

I decided to color code my priorities and set up the following categories, which I have colorized using the “Text Highlight Color” option in Word:

  • Green Highlight: Mandatory requirement – selected software must be able to meet this requirement or it will be eliminated
  • Cyan Highlight:  Highly desirable requirement – selected software should be able to produce this requirement, have a work around or have a similar feature
  • Yellow Highlight:  “Nice to Have” requirement – features which I do not currently use but may in the  a future need for them
  • Light Grey Highlight:  Not required – features that I personally do not currently need nor foresee a future need
Example of the final formatted Requirements Checklist

Example of the final formatted Requirements Checklist

I have not included the checkboxes or priority color-coding in this post. The image above is a sample of what the finished checklist will look like. My priorities are unique to me and do not necessarily reflect those of other individuals. For example, I might list the ability to synchronize my database with an online database as nice to have, but someone else may consider this requirement mandatory. The following is a preliminary list of my requirements.

File Management

  • GEDCOM import and export to and from all selected software candidates for this project
  • Ability to merge files
  • Automatic backups to hard drives, flash drives, external hard drives, and CDs/DVDs
  • Manual backups to hard drives, flash drives, external hard drives, and CDs/DVDs
  • Files can be shared between Windows and Mac versions (with migration tool)
  • Download trees from Ancestry
  • Multiple databases can be opened at the same time
  • Ability to export a branch of your tree
  • Files from Legacy or other genealogy software programs can be directly imported

Reports, Charts, and Books

Reports

  • Ahnentafels
  • Bibliographies
  • Calendars
  • Custom reports
  • Data errors reports
  • Descendant reports (NGSQ and Register formats)
  • Descendant reports (d’Aboville and Modified Henry formats) (Windows only)
  • Documented events reports
  • Family group sheets
  • Family view report
  • Individual reports
  • Index of Individuals reports (Windows only)
  • Kinship reports
  • LDS ordinances reports
  • Marriage reports
  • Media item reports
  • Media usage reports
  • Note reports (Windows only)
  • Outline descendant reports
  • Outline ancestor reports
  • Parentage reports
  • Photo albums
  • Place usage reports
  • Research journals/task lists
  • Source usage reports
  • Surname reports (Windows only)
  • Task List
  • Timelines
  • Undocumented fact reports (Windows only)
  • Save report settings (Windows only)
  • Save reports as PDFs, images, and text files (varies by report format)
  • Print reports with source citations
  • Print reports with preparer information
  • Customize historical events for timelines (Windows only)

Charts

  • Ancestor trees—pedigree
  • Ancestor trees–fan-shaped, bow tie, tree-shaped, or vertical
  • Descendant charts
  • Extended family charts
  • Hourglass charts showing ancestors and descendants
  • Relationship charts
  • Wall charts
  • Custom templates and the ability to create your own
  • Print charts with source citations
  • Print charts with preparer information
  • Add images, photos, and text anywhere (Windows only)
  • Change layout, borders, colors, and formatting

Books

  • Desktop book-building tool that lets you use the facts, photos, and charts you’ve already added to your tree to create a family history. Import text files, automatically generate a table of contents and index of individuals in charts and reports, and export as a PDF or text file.
  • Web-based publishing service that lets you create family histories or photos books with automatically generated pedigree trees, family group sheets, and timelines. Print at home or have a professionally bound book sent to you.
  • Smart Stories—a narrative tool that helps you create biographies of people in your tree. (Windows only)

Multimedia Features

  • Media management in one central location
  • Import a variety of formats: images, documents, and audio/video files
  • Must import PDF, DOC, DOCX, TIF, JPG and PNG at a minimum
  • Must allow PDF, DOC, DOCX, TIF, JPG, PNG and all other multimedia formats to be linked to persons, facts/events, sources, etc.
  • Scan images directly into software
  • Slide shows
  • Categories for grouping and sorting
  • Missing media item tool (Windows only)
  • Items can link to multiple individuals and/or sources and citations

Data Entry and Tools

  • Addresses allow house number, street, town, township, county, state, country, zip
  • Address fields flexible for non-US location entry
  • Alerts for potential errors
  • Blended families view
  • Conditional fact sentences (Windows only)
  • Custom facts
  • Date calculator
  • Fast fields to speed entry of descriptions and locations
  • Find and Replace tool
  • Find Duplicate People tool
  • Global fact updater
  • Global spellcheck
  • LDS facts and display options
  • Locations database with more than 3 million places for consistent data entry
  • Multiple formats for date input and display
  • Name Converter
  • Notes for people, research, facts, media items, and sources—2MB per note (about 200 printed pages)
  • People index can be sorted and filtered
  • Reference numbers for individuals and relationships (Windows only)
  • Relationship Calculator
  • Sort children by birth order (automatic or manual)
  • Soundex Calculator
  • Support for foreign language characters
  • Support for same sex marriage
  • Support for couples living together (same or different sexes)
  • Support for non-related individuals (witnesses, etc.)
  • View people by location, grouping them by country, state, county, and city
  • Web-clipping tool to capture any online information

Sourcing

  • Source templates for simple and consistent source entry
  • Sources and citations can be linked to multiple people and/or facts
  • Repositories
  • Media items can be added to sources and citations
  • Ratings systems
  • Copy-and-paste for citations
  • Merge for duplicate sources

Mapping

  • Dynamic road and satellite maps
  • Migration maps for individuals and families
  • GPS support
  • Identification of nearby cemeteries, churches, and other places of interes

Integration with Ancestry.com [or Other Sites]

  • Ancestry facts and records merge directly into your tree
  • Images can be downloaded to your computer
  • Hints from Ancestry about records that might match people in your tree
  • A desktop tree can be synced with an online tree for access anywhere
  • Mobile apps for iPhone, and iPad devices
  • Mobile app for Android devices
  • Connection with a community of other researchers
  • Multiple privacy options for your online family tree

Help & Support

  • Updates available by download
  • Contextual and online help
  • U.S.-based telephone support
  • Video tutorials (Windows only)
  • Electronic user manual
  • Message boards
  • Online Knowledge Base and FAQ
  • Windows version must be compatible with Windows® 10 Pro 64-bit
  • Length of time the company is in business
  • Subjective factors on continuing longevity of the company

If you see any requirements that I left out or have any other suggestions, please let me know in the comments for this post.

Once this list is finalized, I would be happy to send a copy to anyone who requests it by using my Contact Us form. Please specify if you wish an un-prioritized or prioritized version. I highly recommend doing your own prioritizing.

Related Posts
Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 1
Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 2
Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 3, the Final Phase

Posted in Genealogical Technology, Tech Tuesday | 3 Comments

Where to Research in Carroll County, Maryland – Other Potential Resources- Part 2

This is the eleventh and final post in my series of postings on doing research in my home county of Carroll in Maryland. For the background and history of Carroll County, Maryland, please see my initial post titled “Where to Research in Carroll County, Maryland – The Carroll County Genealogical Society”.

Other Potential Resources
Many of the following societies and museums provide the researcher with historical and cultural perspectives on their family research rather than direct records. Some may offer photos, business ephemera and other artifacts that may interest the family historian. Most of these sites are staffed by volunteers so hours are subject to change. Researchers should call ahead to determine if the site has any information relative to their research and to make an appointment in advance of their visit.

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New Windsor Heritage Museum
207 Main Street
New Windsor, MD 21776
410-635-2602
administrator@newwindsorheritage.org
www.newwindsorheritage.org
https://www.facebook.com/NewWindsorHeritage

The New Windsor Heritage Museum is a source of historical and cultural perspective on early Western Maryland family life, and offers photographs, diaries and other memorabilia on local families. It is open most Saturdays 10:00 am – 1:00 pm.

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Sykesville Colored Schoolhouse
524 Schoolhouse Road
Sykesville, MD 21784
410-795-8959
SchoolHouse@sykesville.net
http://www.townofsykesville.org/2153/Historic-Colored-Schoolhouse

To schedule an appointment, call Ms. Greenwald at 410-795-8959.

Taneytown History Museum
340 East Baltimore Street
Taneytown, MD 21787
410-756-4234
THandMA@gmail.com
http://taneytownhh.org/

In October 2014, the Taneytown Heritage Committee, established in 1986, and the Taneytown History Museum, established in 2004, merged to form Taneytown Heritage and Museum Association, Inc. Due to accessibilities issues with the old location, the museum is being moved to a new location. The Taneytown History Museum is closed at present. A grand opening celebration is planned for spring, 2016, when the new location at 340 East Baltimore Street, Taneytown will be ready to open for visitors. Watch the web site for more details.

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Western Maryland Railway Historical Society and Museum
41 N. Main Street
Union Bridge, MD  21791
410-775-0150
http://www.moosevalley.org/wmrhs/wmrhsindex.htm

The museum is open to the public Sundays 1 to 4 p.m., and by appointment. To arrange a time, call (410) 775-0150 and leave a message, or write the Society at the address given.

Posted in Local Societies, Maryland Research Tips, Where to Research | Leave a comment

Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 3, the Final Phase

GenSoftFinal smMy first transition plan post, Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 1 encompassed the first phase of my project, identifying my requirements both mandatory and optional, addressing cleaning up my database and preparing my data for import into my selected evaluation programs. I have scheduled execution of Phase 1 of my plan to begin on Friday, January 15, 2016. I have decided to devote Friday mornings to completing all the activities required by my plan. I will document and try to post my experiences.

The second post, Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 2 described activities designed both to analyze which GEDCOM file I will use for my imports to other programs and to collect some preliminary results from all the imports.

In this my third and final post of this project plan, I get to do a lot more work and make some tough decisions. This third and final phase completes the project through live testing, analyses of results and final selection of my FTM replacement software through the following activities:

1. Using the file that imported with the least errors in each program, fix all remaining errors
The last activity in Phase 2 should provide me with the best and cleanest candidate GEDCOM file to use for live testing. During this activity, I plan to fix any remaining errors found in Phase 2, if feasible, prior to starting live testing.

2. Test each program and document results
In Phase 1, I created a list of requirements, identifying them as either mandatory or optional. Each requirement will necessitate a specific scenario that can be tested in each evaluation program. During this activity, I plan to design and document a test scenario for each requirement. I will then execute the test scenario in each evaluation software alternative, documenting my results. In some cases this may be simple pass or fail; in other cases more clarification may be needed. I have added one recently discovered program to my evaluation list: Family Tree Builder 7.  My test list now reads:

All of the above programs are the paid, registered versions and all are the Windows version. I will be testing in both the Windows 7 & Windows 10 Pro 64-bit operating systems using Office 2010 (Win7) and Office 365 (Win10) with Internet Explorer 11 (Win7 & Win10) and Edge (Win 10) as my browsers.

3. Analyze live test results and make final software selection
First, I will review my live test results and eliminate any program that did not meet my mandatory requirements. I hope that there will be a few programs left to analyze. My goal will be to identify that single program that can become my primary genealogy software database and data entry. I will probably retain most of the other software programs to use, as previously, for unique reports or features not found in my primary program. In addition, I will determine when I will do the actual transition to the newly selected software—this may or may not be at the conclusion of this evaluation project.

Writing this phase of the transition plan alerted me to the fact that upon completion I will have a new project to plan—the actual transitioning of all my FTM databases to the new software.

As you can tell, I tend to be a planner. I like to know where I am going and how I am going to get there prior to starting the journey. Are you a planner, too or do you just like to wing it? If you are a planner, was any of this project plan (Phases 1, 2 and 3) useful to you?

*Family Historian 6 – Copyright by Calico Pie Limited
*Ancestral Quest 14 – Copyright by Incline Software, LC
*Brother’s Keeper 7 – Copyright by Brother’s Keeper
*Heredis 2015 for Windows – Copyright by Heredis / BSD Concept
*Legacy 8.0 Deluxe – Copyright by Millennia Corporation
*Roots Magic 7.0 – Copyright by RootsMagic, Inc.
*Family Tree Builder 7 – Copyright by MyHeritage Ltd

 

Posted in Genealogical Technology, Genealogy Databases, Tech Tuesday | 8 Comments

Old Bones Genealogy Blog – Top 5 Posts for 2015

Posted on January 1, 2016 in Blogging

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I recently received an email from WordPress containing a link to my annual report in blogging for 2015. The following posts were listed as the top five posts viewed in 2015 on my blog Old Bones Genealogy.

1. Genealogy Mysteries
I love a mystery. Since my youth, I have been an avid reader of the mystery genre. How does this relate to genealogy? With my first discovery researching my family, I felt the adrenal rush of solving a mystery and my addiction was born. I wanted to merge my two loves so I began researching the mystery book market for genealogy related mysteries. To my surprise, I uncovered several mystery series that star amateur and professional genealogists as the detective.

2. Genealogy Mysteries – Expanded & Updated
In 2012, I published my first post, titled Genealogy Mysteries, which is still my number 1 post for 2015. It provides a summary of all the genealogy mysteries I discovered at tha

t time. In 2014, I published an expanded update in the post Genealogy Mysteries – Expanded. Since then, I have expanded the list to add more new books, authors, and series in this sub-genre.

3. Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 1
Recently, Ancestry.com announced that they are retiring their software product, Family Tree Maker (current version is Family Tree Maker 2014) on December 31, 2015. They will support the program until December 31, 2016. Because my background is in IT and project management, I immediately put together a project plan to aid my transition from FTM 2014 to another software program. I decided to share this plan as others may find it useful.

4. Early Land Grants in Maryland
This post documents my learning experience exploring Maryland land records both state and county. I made use of various land record websites provided by the Maryland State Archives. My discoveries included learning that all land Patents are on microfilm but not online and that there is a treasure trove of land surveys available online through MDLandRec.net (via Plats.net).

5. More Genealogy Mysteries
In addition to the Orchard series that I have previously mentioned in my earlier Genealogy Mysteries posts, Sheila Connolly authors the Museum Mysteries set in Philadelphia and featuring Nell Pratt. Sheila Connolly used to work at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Thank you for visiting my blog and making this a great year. I hope you continue to read my posts in 2016. I wish a healthy, prosperous and happy New Year to you and yours! Best wishes for the coming year and may we all realize our goals.

Posted in Blogging | Leave a comment

Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 2

Posted on December 29, 2015 in Genealogical Technology, Tech Tuesday

My prior post, Tech Tuesday – My Family Tree Maker Transition Plan: Phase 1 encompassed the first phase of my project, addressing cleaning up my database and selecting and installing my evaluation programs. I have scheduled execution of Phase 1 of my plan to begin on Friday, January 15, 2016. I have decided to devote Friday mornings to completing all the activities required by my plan. I will document and try to post my experiences.

This phase (Phase 2) is designed to both analyze which GEDCOM file I will use for my imports to other programs and collect some preliminary results from all the imports. It relies heavily on The Master Genealogist (TMG). If you do not use or own this program, you can skip tasks 1, 2 & 4.

Start up page in TMG using sample database

1. Import the FTM 2008/2009 file into TMG 9 In an earlier post, Why I Use FTM as My Primary Genealogy Program, I discuss using TMG as an intermediary step when transferring data from FTM into other programs.

“…My first discovery was that the GEDCOM file produced by FTM did not import well into RM or Legacy. My workaround for this was to first import my FTM file directly into TMG. Then create the GEDCOM from TMG and import it into RM and Legacy. Thank goodness, with the advent of FTM 2012, I no longer have to do this…”

Although FTM 2012 and above import directly into other programs much better than previous versions, I decided I wanted to try this additional step so I could determine which way was really the best:  directly import my data using FTM generated GEDCOM files or import my data via TMG generated GEDCOM files. After I complete the import of the FTM 2008/2009 file into TMG, I will save the import log (error report) for future analysis.

2. Export TMG database to a GEDCOM 5.5 file named My Family TMG Completing this task will leave me with two GEDCOM 5.5 files: My Family TMG and My Family FTM, which I produced in Phase 1.

3. Load the MY Family FTM GEDCOM file into each of the evaluation programs Print or save the log/error reports produced by each import. As I said earlier, my evaluation programs are not cast in stone. Based upon the requirements I define in Phase 1, I may add or subtract evaluation programs. Tentatively the planned programs are:

  • Family Historian 6.0 or later
  • Ancestral Quest 14 or later
  • Brother’s Keeper 7 or later
  • Heredis 2015 or later
  • Legacy 8.0 or later
  • Roots Magic 7.0 or later

4. Load the My Family TMG GEDCOM file into each of the evaluation programs Print or save the log/error reports produced by each import. Tentatively the planned programs are:

  • Family Historian 6.0 or later
  • Ancestral Quest 14 or later
  • Brother’s Keeper 7 or later
  • Heredis 2015 or later
  • Legacy 8.0 or later
  • Roots Magic 7.0 or later

5. Evaluate all reports Determine which of the two GEDCOM files produced the cleanest database when imported into all the evaluation programs. Identify which file to use in the live testing phase and detect what kinds of errors are still being generated and by which programs.

The upcoming Phase 3 will address the live testing of all the final evaluation programs against my requirements. Remember that for now Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities are just planned. I have not actually performed any of these tasks so I don’t know what will be successful and what won’t.

I realize I am being somewhat fussy about getting my data really cleaned up prior to importing it into my final selected software. That is because 1) I was appalled at how many errors I found that had crept in over the years; and 2) if at all possible, my goal is to start my new software program with an error free database.

How about you? Do you plan to correct your data before or after you move it to another program? Any suggestions as to what other programs I might evaluate?

Posted in Genealogical Technology, Tech Tuesday | 1 Comment

Blog Caroling – In Old Judea

Posted on December 23, 2015 in Blog Caroling

2015 Blog Caroling Songbook corr fr sm

In Old Judea is the first new (as in not one of the traditional) carol I learned as a child in the children’s choir of St. Margaret Mary’s RC Church in Essington, Delaware Co., PA–back in the early fifties. It’s one of my favorites.

You can hear the music of In Old Judea played on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGgwRkAFX_0 and you can see it performed by the junior class of Villa Maria Academy High School at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrY1HFwrBmg. Just copy and paste these links into your browser. In addition, see the official lyrics below:

In Old Judea

Music by Adam Geibel and words by Richard Henry Buck, 1901

In old Judea, amid the plains afar,
Mine eyes behold a brightly shining star;
Bathed in the splendor that floods the eastern skies,
Within a manger, a sleeping baby lies.
Though meek and lowly, a radiance holy
Illumes the place with wondrous light;
While on the hillsides and in the valley,
The angel host sings through the night:

Glory to God, all glory to God!
Voices exultingly ring;
Peace and goodwill in the hearts of men,
Hail to the newborn King!
Hail to the newborn King!

In old Judea, where Christ the Lord was born,
In Bethlehem, that blessed Christmas morn,
The stars still shining, in beauty overhead,
On all the world, its loving beams are shed.
The crimson glory of Calv’ry’s story
Is hallowed by its softened glow,
While all the people of earth are singing
The angels’ song of long ago

Glory to God, all glory to God!
Voices exultingly ring;
Peace and goodwill in the hearts of men,
Hail to the newborn King!
Hail to the newborn King!

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