52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #30 Andrew C Gunther (1858 – 1931) – A Research Challenge

Posted on July 28, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 30 is “Challenging: It’s a good time to take a look at another challenging-to-research ancestor.”

The Gunther Family. first row: left to right, Raymond Peter Gunther, Andrew C. Gunther, Marguerite Gunther, Eva Meisberger Kestener Gunther, and Ilene Lorraine Gunther, second row: left to right, Mary Viola Gunther, Wilson Francis Gunther, Annette Geraldine Gunther, and John Albert Gunther. Photo courtesy of Lynne Maminski

The Gunther Family. first row: left to right, Raymond Peter Gunther, Andrew C. Gunther, Marguerite Gunther, Eva Meisberger Kestener Gunther, and Ilene Lorraine Gunther, second row: left to right, Mary Viola Gunther, Wilson Francis Gunther, Annette Geraldine Gunther, and John Albert Gunther. Photo courtesy of Lynne Maminski

 

My great-grandfather, Andrew (Andreas) C. Gunther, is one of my major brick walls. He is challenging to research on several points. According to his death certificate and supported by the 1900 US census, Andrew was born 11 February 1858 in Germany. I am trying to find his birthplace but do not have a town of birth just a country; and, Andrew’s surname, Gunther, is very common in Germany.

Andrew’s naturalization papers state that he arrived in the US on 2 Jun 1881 sailing from Hamburg with a destination of Coal Township, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. The ship’s name is not provided and his place of birth is listed only as Germany. The 1900, 1910 and 1920 US censuses all support the year 1881 for his immigration.

I found the following Andreas Gunther entries in the New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 on Ancestry:

  • Andreas Gunther, b. abt. 1858, arr. 20 May 1872, from Hamburg on the Vandalia
  • Andreas Gunther, b. abt. 1857, arr. 23 May 1874, from Hamburg on the Rhein
  • Andras Gunther, b. abt. 1859, arr. 7 July 1881, from Bremen on the Elbe
  • Andreas Gunther, b. abt. 1856, arr. 13 July 1885, from Hamburg on the Lessing
  • Andreas Gunther, b. abt. 1854, arr. 31 August 1872, from Bremen on the Weser

As you can see, none of them really matches the information that I have for my great-grandfather. The 1930 US census also gives his immigration year as 1881 and possibly provides one clue to a town/city of birth:  the enumerator lists Frankfort, Germany as the birthplace of Andrew and his parents (US Census, 1930, Pennsylvania, Northumberland, Coal, District 5, image 27 of 71).

I have all the documentation I could find on Andrew and I am now beginning to do some collateral research on this family. It is a challenge but I love it!

 

 

Week 30 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

Posted in 52 Ancestors, Family History | Leave a comment

More Genealogy Mysteries

Posted on July 23, 2015 in Genealogy Mysteries

In 2012, I published my first post, which was titled Genealogy Mysteries. It provided a summary of the genealogy mysteries I discovered at that time. In 2014, I published Genealogy Mysteries – Expanded and earlier this year, I published Genealogy Mysteries – Expanded and Updated.

Since then, I have been accumulating and reading new books, authors, and series in this sub-genre. For those of you who also enjoy genealogy and reading mysteries, I would like to share these recent discoveries.

Privy to the Dead corr smIn addition to the Orchard series that I have previously mentioned, Sheila Connolly authors the Museum Mysteries set in Philadelphia and featuring Nell Pratt. Sheila Connolly used to work at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. See below for more on this series.

The latest news is that two of my favorite genealogy mystery writers are releasing new books this year.

The new Morton Farrier, Forensic Genealogist book, The America Ground, by Nathan Dylan Goodwin will be published in September 2015, and Steve Robinson just submitted his next Jefferson Tayte book to the publisher. I am really looking forward to these new releases.

The Museum Mysteries by Sheila Connolly star Nell Pratt, president of the Pennsylvania Antiquarian Society (think Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia) who spends much of her time solving murders through research in their collections. These books are fascinating for their mysteries, their history, and our glimpses into the lives of the archivists. Highly recommended.

  • Fundraising the Dead (2010)
  • Let’s Play Dead (2011)
  • Fire Engine Dead (2012 )
  • Monument to the Dead (2013)
  • Razing the Dead (2014)
  • Privy to the Dead (2015)

In the Morton Farrier, Forensic Genealogist series by Nathan Dylan Goodwin, we discover a stubborn, determined man who uses whatever means necessary to uncover the past. Great series! If you haven’t already read these, I highly recommend them. I can’t wait for September.

  • Hiding the Past (2013)
  • The Lost Ancestor (2014)
  • The Orange Lilies: A Morton Farrier novella (2014)
  • The America Ground (2015) – scheduled for September release

The Jefferson Tayte mysteries by Steve Robinson feature a professional genealogist who ferrets out family secrets and old mysteries using genealogy research primarily in the UK. This series is a page-turner and keeps getting better and better. I can’t wait for the next one later this year; the title and publication date have not been officially announced yet.

  • In the Blood (2011)
  • To the Grave (2012)
  • The Last Queen of England (2012)
  • The Lost Empress (Oct 2014)

In the Family History Mysteries by Brynn Bonner, genealogist Sophreena McClure is an expert at unearthing other people’s secrets. Using old documents and photographs, Soph and her business partner, Esme Sabatier—also a gifted medium—trace family histories and create heritage scrapbooks.

  • Paging the Dead (2013)
  • Death in Reel Time (2014)
  • Picture Them Dead (2015)

Geraldine Wall writes about probate researcher Anna Ames in this trilogy. These are mystery thrillers and we are drawn in to Anna’s family, life and work.

  • File Under Fear (2014)
  • File Under Family (2014)
  • File Under Fidelity (2015)

In Silent Legacy: Discovering Family Secrets by Diana Church (2014) some German immigration history with new finds from a research trip helps Ellen O’Donnell solve a long-standing family mystery.

In Finding Eliza by Stephanie Pitcher Fishman (2014), an old diary leads Lizzie Clydell down a dusty road of lies, hidden family secrets, and a lynching that nearly destroyed her family.   I loved the quote “It’s just a little family history. What could go wrong?”

Where’s Merrill? A genealogical thriller by Gearoid O’Neary (2013) mystery thriller based upon real life historical events. The story unravels as Irish genealogist, Jed, researches his client’s mysterious maternal ancestry.

Benjamin’s Ghosts: An Enid Gilchrist Mystery by Sylvia A. Nash (2014) is a cozy genealogy murder mystery set in West Tennessee. This is the start of a promising series. I hope we hear more from this author.

In the Tainted Tree by Jacquelynn Luben (2013) Addie Russell inherits a house in Surrey and begins researching her English family Her research takes her back three generations to the First World War.

All of the books mentioned here are available in Kindle editions and can be found at Amazon.com.

Posted in Genealogy Mysteries | Leave a comment

52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #29 Christopher McGinn (1871 – 1903) – Tombstone Tuesday

Posted on July 21, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History, Tombstone Tuesday
Tombstone of Christopher McGinn, St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Locust Gap, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania

Tombstone of Christopher McGinn, St. Joseph’s Cemetery, Locust Gap, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania

Christopher McGinn is the son of Christopher McGinn and Anna Delaney McGinn and he is my 2nd great uncle.

According to another researcher, who has a copy of the marriage license, Christopher McGinn married Mary McDonnell on 20 Oct 1899 in Locust Gap, Northumberland Co., PA by Leo Fair. In the 1900 US census, Mary and he were living in the residence of her parents. With the 1910 US census, Mary was head of household with children John, born about 1902 and Mary, born about 1904 (based on ages in the census record).

According to the obituary in the local newspaper, Tuesday, September 15, 1903, Christopher McGinn died of cholera morbus (an archaic term assigned to all illnesses resembling cholera) on 14 September 1903 in Locust Gap, He was 32 years old and left a wife and two small children. If so, both children were born prior to their father’s death and their ages in the 1910 census may be incorrect.

Christopher’s wife Mary never remarried finally dying on 25 May 1945 in Philadelphia, PA.

 

 

Week 29 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

Posted in 52 Ancestors, Family History, Tombstone Tuesday | Leave a comment

52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #28 Edward A. McGinn, Sr. (1859 – 1914) – Sunday’s Obituary

Posted on July 19, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History, Sundays Obituary
Obituary of Edward McGinn, Mt. Carmel Item, Vol. XXVII No. 43, Dec. 21, 1914, page 1

Obituary of Edward McGinn, Mt. Carmel Item, Vol. XXVII No. 43, Dec. 21, 1914, page 1

 

Edward McGinn is the son of Christopher McGinn and Anna Delaney McGinn and he is my 2nd great uncle. According to his death certificate, he was born 14 April 1859.  He married Ellen T. Hogan and fathered eight children: Christ, John, Edward, Irene, Leo, James, Margaret and Aloysius.

He died of heart disease on 19 December 1914. There are a couple of discrepancies between this obituary and his death certificate—Edward’s age, a missing daughter, and a new daughter.

As you can see, the obituary places him at age 66. The death certificate gives Edward’s age as 55, which is correct if he was born in 1859, otherwise the birth date is inaccurate. The birth year of 1859 is supported by the 1860, 1870, 1880, 1900 and 1910 censuses.

The new daughter mentioned in the obituary is Catherine. I find no reference to her in any of the census records from 1900 through 1930.

The missing daughter is Margaret. In 1910 US census, their youngest child is Aloysius, who was born after Margaret. Margaret is not mentioned as a surviving child, although she was 4 years old in the 1910 census. I did find a death certificate for Margaret and she died 24 March 1915 of heart failure. I wonder if she was the child, mentioned in the obituary, who was seriously ill.

 

 

Week 28 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

Posted in 52 Ancestors, Family History, Sundays Obituary | Leave a comment

Using FamilySearch to Discover Maryland Wills

Posted on July 15, 2015 in Genealogy Databases, Genealogy Search Tips

Family Search has a database containing many records from the Register of Wills office of various counties in Maryland. It was updated November 3, 2014. This database contains administrative indexes, administrative accounts, administrative bonds, claims dockets, estate papers, executors and administrators, guardian accounts, indentures, inventories, minutes of proceedings, releases, sales of personal property, sales of real estate, will indexes and wills.

To access the wills go to www.familysearch.org. If you are not already a member, use the Free Account option to register. Once you are signed in, select the Search icon on the home page. On the map select the United States; then select Maryland. A list of databases for Maryland will appear.

Scroll down the page until you see Probate and Court. Select the database named Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999. On the next page, select “Browse through 1,933,787 images (the number of images will increase as they add records)”. You are presented with a list of counties. For this exercise, select Carroll. Scroll down the page of databases until you get to the ‘Ws’ and ‘Wills’.

To access the will books, first view the index for the years you are researching. The index is alphabetical by testator and provides the Liber No. [Book no.], Folio [Page], testator name, executor or administrator name, and date of probate. For example, “Will index 1837-1939 Vol HGB, no 1” contains as the first entry:

Ann Maria Angel is in Liber J.B. 1, Folio 428. The executor was J. Henry Hoppe and the estate was probated Aug. 10, 1846.

Using this information select “Wills 1837-1852, Vol JB, no. 1.” Then enter the folio number in the image box. This takes you to page 384 in the will book, which is 44 pages less than the page desired. So add 428 + 44 = 472. Then enter 472 into the image box, which takes you to Folio (page) 428 in the will book. At the bottom of the page is the start of the will for Ann Maria Angel. Adjusting the Folio or document page number is necessary to equate it to an image number.

Ann Maria Angel, Liber J.B. 1, Folio 428 (database image 472)

Ann Maria Angel, Liber J.B. 1, Folio 428 (database image 472)

Scrolling past the will book databases, you come to the will manuscripts. If the database name does not contain a vol (volume), then it is most likely one of the collections of loose wills rather than a will book. These wills are more difficult to access since they are arranged by year/month and then will number. To access, just select the years/months you wish to browse, for example, “Wills 1872 Apr-Dec, no 1121-1160”. This database contains 242 images, which you need to browse to see if the will you want is in this database. Most of these databases are under 300 images to make it easier to browse, so if you have a good idea of the date range, you should be able to find your will.

Please feel free to explore these and all the other Maryland databases available in this collection on Family Search. Thank you to all the volunteers who made this collection possible.

 

Posted in Genealogy Databases, Genealogy Search Tips | Leave a comment

52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #27 Anna Noble Ryan

Posted on July 8, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History
Saint Joseph’s RC Church, Locust Gap, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania (1887 – 1995)

Saint Joseph’s RC Church, Locust Gap, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania (1887 – 1995)

 

I had an interesting find today so this week I would like to highlight my great aunt Anna Noble. Anna was the daughter of Thomas and Margaret (McGinn) Noble. She was born on 9 August 1884 and baptized in St. Joseph’s Church in Locust Gap, Northumberland County (Co.), Pennsylvania (PA). Her uncle, John McGinn and her aunt, Rose Ann Noble were sponsors.

Anna Noble married James William Ryan on 17 August 1911 at Saint Patrick’s Church in Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., PA. The 1920 US census finds them living in Philadelphia with their son, Thomas, age 6 and her brother Thomas Noble, Jr., age 37.

In the 1930 US census, they are living in Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne Co., PA with two children, a son, John, age 10 and a daughter, Margaret, age 10–maybe fraternal twins. There is no mention of Thomas, who would have been 16 for this census. Well, I just solved that mystery. I found a death certificate for Thomas. He died 10 April 1924 in Mt. Carmel, Northumberland Co., PA at the age of 11 when he was struck by an automobile.

In the 1940 US census, their residence was in St. Clair, Schuylkill Co., PA and was the same in 1935 and in 1933, when her mother died. There I lost her until this morning when I found a death certificate for her husband, James Ryan.

Back to my interesting find… This find was interesting because, lucky for me, he died in Philadelphia, PA, but his usual residence is listed as Camden, Camden Co., New Jersey (NJ). The information was provided by Anna Ryan. James died 2 November 1956. Apparently, he was in Philadelphia visiting or on business and he had a fatal stroke. If he had died in New Jersey, I might never have found them.

Although, I know she was alive and in Camden in 1956, I do not know if she remained there or moved back to Pennsylvania. She does not show up in the PA Death Certificates on Ancestry but it feasible that she may have died after the cut-off date. Another mystery remaining to be solved.
 

Week 27 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

Posted in 52 Ancestors, Family History | Leave a comment

52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #26 Candido ‘Condy’ Furlani (1888 – 1938)

Posted on June 30, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 26 is “Halfway: This week marks the halfway point in the year — and the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge! What ancestor do you have that you feel like you’ve only researched halfway? What ancestor do you feel like takes up half of your research efforts?”

For the halfway mark, I have chosen my grandfather, Candido Furlani. Candido went by the name Condy in the United States. I never knew him as he died before I was born. I selected him for this week’s post because I feel that I am only halfway through my research on his line.

The plaza in Vigolo Vattaro ca. 1909 in Tyrol, Austria prior to the town becoming part of Italy in 1918

The plaza in Vigolo Vattaro ca. 1909 in Tyrol, Austria prior to the town becoming part of Italy in 1918

Years ago, I began researching Condy and his family. I was able to find to Family History Library (FHL) microfilm rolls for the baptisms and marriages in his parish in the Diocese of Trento [Trent] in the town of Vigolo Vattaro, Trentino Province, Italy in a region known as Trentino-Alto-Adige/Südtirol.  Prior to WWI, this town was in Tyrol and part of the Austrian-Hungary Empire.

I am about halfway through each microfilm. I have it on my To-Do list to start going back to my local Family History Center (FHC) to finish viewing them. This is what I have so far on my Furlani surname.

My grandfather, Candido Luigi Furlani, son of Giovanni Battista Domenico Furlani and Maria Dominica Dallabrida, was born on 26 Mar 1888 in Vigolo Vattaro, Tyrol, Austria. He died on 18 Feb 1938 of black lung disease in Cambria, Pennsylvania, USA (State Sanatorium #2). He married Anna Bianchi on 20 Sep 1911 in Saint Peter’s RC Church, Mount Carmel, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. She was born on 16 Jan 1894 in Mount Carmel. She died on 21 Mar 1973 in Media, Delaware County, PA.

My great-grandfather, Giovanni Battista Domenico Furlani, son of Giovanni Battista Domenico Furlani and Catterina Dominica Marchi, was born on 08 Feb 1858 in Vigolo Vattaro. He died about 1910 in Vigolo Vattaro. He married Maria Dominica Dallabrida about 1882 in Vigolo Vattaro.

My great-grandmother, Maria Dominica Dallabrida, daughter of Valentino Dallabrida and Dominica Filomena Martinelli Dallabrida, was born on 01 Aug 1858 in Vigolo Vattaro, Tyrol, Austria. She died about 1930 in Vigolo Vattaro, Trentino, Italy.

My 2nd great-grandfather, Giovanni Battista Domenico Furlani, son of Giovanni Battista Furlani and Maria Nicoletti, was born on 24 Sep 1830 and died about 1889 in Vigolo Vattaro. He married Catterina Dominica Marchi on 25 Feb 1854 in Vigolo Vattaro.

My 2nd great-grandmother, Catterina Dominica Marchi, daughter of Bartolo Marchi and Barbara Nicoletti, was born about 1834 and died about 1894 in Vigolo Vattaro.

My 3rd great-grandfather, Giovanni Battista Furlani was born about 1810 and died about 1865 in Vigolo Vattaro. He married Maria Nicoletti about 1832 in Vigolo Vattaro.

My 3rd great-grandmother, Maria Nicoletti was born about 1810 and died about 1870 in Vigolo Vattaro.

 

Week 26 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

Posted in 52 Ancestors, Family History | Leave a comment

52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #25 Three Old Family Homes

Posted on June 23, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 25 is “The Old Homestead: Have you visited an ancestral home? Do you have photos of an old family house? Do you have homesteading ancestors?”

I have three photographs of old family homes—one that I took and two that I found in that ubiquitous box of photos inherited from my mother.

The first home is that of my paternal grandparents, Condy and Anna Bianchi Furlani. I have not been able to find a deed for their purchase of this home. They were married in 1911 and I know they were not living here when my father was born in 1912. I have the deed from when the house was sold in 1974 to settle the estate of my grandmother, Anna Bianchi Furlani Profit, who died 21 March 1973. My grandfather has already died in 1938 so I never met him.

525 W. Girard St., Village of Atlas, Mt. Carmel Twp., Northumberland Co., PA

525 W. Girard St., Village of Atlas, Mt. Carmel Twp., Northumberland Co., PA

 

I remember visiting her during the summer when I was a child. At that time, the back of the house faced the foothills of a small mountain across a road. There were huge snowball bushes along the side of the house, no shed and next to it an open field.

My sister and I used to climb up the foothills early in the morning to collect huckleberries for our breakfast. We also liked watching the “billy goats” that roamed the hills. Today, there are no hills or mountain—it has been mined to the ground and the road is now a four-lane highway. So sad…

The second and homes are my unknowns. I feel sure that these homes belonged to my maternal ancestors and relatives. My second great grandfather, Theobald Meisberger, over time, had purchased four lots in Coal Twp., Northumberland Co., PA; and he built four houses on them. On his death, they were inherited by his children and their spouses. Most of my other ancestors and relatives only rented.

I do not know the owners or location of either of these two homes, only that they are most likely in the Ranshaw area of Coal Township (which I believe is now a suburb of the city of Shamokin).

Single family home decorated for July 4th

Single family home decorated for July 4th

 

Duplex home fronting on a street

Duplex home fronting on a street

 

I can’t really make out any of the faces in either photo. The photos do not enlarge well and tend to become pixelated. I welcome feedback from anyone who can shed some light on these photos. Let me know with your comments if you recognize the either the homes or any of the family members shown.

 

 

 

Week 25 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

Posted in 52 Ancestors, Family History | 4 Comments

52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #24 A Sentimental Heirloom

Posted on June 17, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History, Family Memories
Valentine's Day card -  Marguerite Noble Furlani to William C. Furlani 1945

Valentine’s Day card – Marguerite Noble Furlani to William C. Furlani 1945

The theme for Week 23 is “Heirloom: What heirloom do you treasure? Who gave it to you? What heirloom do you wish you had?”

I found this card in the box of photos that my sisters and I inherited from our parents. This is a Valentine’s card that my mother, Marguerite “Mickey” Noble Furlani, sent to my father, William Condy Furlani, for Valentine’s Day 1945.

The enclosed letter, written by my mother, says at the top “A lock of Eileen’s hair” and, at the bottom “With love and kisses to dady, Eileen.” My mother’s note at the bottom states, “Eileen wrote this.”

I find this hard to believe as I would have been two years old at the time but the handwriting is different. I suspect my mother guided my hand. Although why did she misspell daddy?

My father, at that time, was still in military service for WWII. He enlisted in the Army on 10 January 1944 in New Cumberland, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He was discharged on 7 December 1945 at the Separation Center in [Fort] Indiantown Gap, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania.

Sometime prior to February of 1945, my father stepped on a landmine in Germany and he was hospitalized. I have a postcard from U.S.A.H.P. 4167, APO 118, c/o Postmaster New York that states on 9 March 1945, he was convalescing from a wound of the left leg. This postcard does not say where he is convalescing. According to his pension application, he was in Foreign Service until 1 December 1945. His Foreign Service period began on 11 August 1944.

I think I remember him saying that he was hospitalized in England at some point in time. The wound left shrapnel in his leg and caused him to walk with a slight limp the rest of his life.

While I have several items I inherited from my parents, this card is my favorite.

 

 

Week 24 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

Posted in 52 Ancestors, Family History, Family Memories | Leave a comment

52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #23 The Anniversary Is the Same

Posted on June 8, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 23 is “Wedding: June is time for weddings. Write about a June bride in your family or highlight a favorite wedding photo. Maybe there’s a serial marry-er in the family — that could be a fun post!”

My 33rd wedding anniversary is approaching on 12 June; so I am highlighting those couples in my family tree whose wedding also occurred on 12 June. A search of my database revealed two couples who meet this criterion.

Mary Viola Gunther, my great-aunt, married John J. Schuck on 12 June 1907 in Coal Township, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. Most likely, they were married either in St. Edward’s church (now Mother Cabrini), since both were buried in this cemetery; or in St. Joseph’s church (now Our Lady of Hope), also in Coal Township.

Their daughter and my first cousin once removed, Marguerite Schuck (1920 – 2004) married Clement E. Konetski (abt. 1916 – 1992) on 12 June 1940 in St. Joseph’s church in Coal Township. They are both buried in St. Edward’s cemetery in Coal Township.

Related to these families but not part of the anniversary is the same theme are Mary Viola Gunther’s parents, Andrew C. Gunther (1858 – 1931) and Eva Meisberger (1861 – 1941). Andrew and Eva were married on 11 February 1884 in St. Edward’s church in Coal Township. Here is the oldest photo in my collection and, what I believe is their wedding photo.

Probable wedding photo of Andrew Gunther and Eva Meisberger 11 Feb 1884

Probable wedding photo of Andrew Gunther and Eva Meisberger 11 Feb 1884

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 23 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

Posted in 52 Ancestors, Family History | Leave a comment