Finding Victor’s Father: Completing the Story

Posted on September 23, 2016 in Family Stories

In my earlier blog post “52 Ancestors: #8 Who Is Victor Bianchi”, I told the story of the young boy who appeared in my great-grandmother’s household in the 1910 US census. I told of my searches through the records, my proof argument that he was the son of her daughter, Mary Bianchi, and the final evidence confirming my answer in the following obituary.

An obituary in the Mount Carmel News Item, dated 12/13/2006, reports the death of Victor Bianchi at the age of 98. A copy of this article says it all:

“KULPMONT — Victor F. Bianchi, formerly of 26 Second St., Strong, passed peacefully at the age of 98 on Tuesday, Dec. 12, at Serenity Gardens, where he was a guest the past four years.

He was born in Atlas on Oct. 19, 1908, and was a son of the late Mary Bianchi. He was a lifelong resident of Strong and was employed as a miner and steel worker.

He was married July 4, 1932, in St. Patrick’s Church in Philadelphia to the former Mary E. Pollock, who preceded him in death on March 22, 2005.

He was a member of Divine Redeemer Church in Mount Carmel, and formerly a member of St. Paul’s Chapel in Atlas.”

But does it really tell it all. After all, who was Victor’s father? I was telling the story of Victor to a friend of mine the other day. As I mentioned to her that Victor was born in 1908 and my great-grandfather had died in 1906, a light went on. I know that Ancestry has the Pennsylvania Birth Records from 1906 through 1908 online.

I wondered if it could be possible…

I found Victor’s birth certificate in this collection and, sure enough, it listed his mother as Mary Bianchi and his father as Albano Burrotti, age 23, born in Austria. YES!

Ancestry.com, Pennsylvania, Birth Records, 1906-1908 (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015), Ancestry.com, http://www.ancestry.com, Record for Victor Beanci. http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=General-60484&h=634637&indiv=try.

Ancestry.com, Pennsylvania, Birth Records, 1906-1908(database online. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015 (Ancestry.com, http://www.ancestry.com, accessed 17 September 2016). Record for Victor Bianci.

 

A search on Ancestry has turned up nothing more on Albano. His residence is listed as Austria so he may have been just visiting, but I could not find a passport. Also, his name could really undergo some significant misspellings in the records. Most men in this township were coal miners so Albano may have moved to another county where the mines were hiring. Many of the men listing Austria as their place of birth in this township came from the Tyrol, with the bulk arriving between 1880 and 1915. Albano may have arrived and left – all within the period between the 1900 and 1910 US censuses. Still looking.

 

 

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(Not So) Wordless Wednesday – Who Are These Women?

Posted on September 14, 2016 in Wordless Wednesday

I am using this theme primarily to post my mystery photos in hopes that someday I’ll be able to solve them.

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This photo was unidentified and in the box of photos that my sisters and I inherited from our mother.

The two women may be from my Meisberger, Gunther or Bianchi lines. My feeling is that their birth surname may be Gunther. In fact, the woman on the right looks something like my grandmother, Lorraine Gunther Noble, when she was younger, as seen in other photos. It was likely taken in Coal Township, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania.

I believe the photo may have been taken during the 1920s and possibly inside a home, if that is a fireplace behind them. There appear to be boxes or books sitting on the mantle. At the same time, the walls could be exterior, so the entire scene may be outside a house, so is that a window, a fireplace or a doorway? I am intrigued by the metal device that is seen to the right in the photo. I have no clue what that is.

I wonder what they were dressed for? Was dressing up like a married couple popular in the 1920s? Maybe they were putting on a play. Living in the coal mining region of Northumberland County, there may not have been too much opportunity for the families of coal miners to afford professional entertainment.

My last question is whether the photo was professionally done or just a box camera snapshot.  Maybe one of the family was an amateur photographer. I don’t feel that this was a commercial product but I could be wrong.

I am open to any information or corrections concerning this photo. I would love to be able to put names to their faces and to better understand this photo. Please help me give them names.

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Society Saturday – Maryland Land Records

Posted on September 10, 2016 in Society Saturday

ccgslogocolorvsmallThe Carroll County Genealogical Society’s upcoming meeting on Monday, September 19, 2016 at 7:30 p.m.* features Rachel Frazier. Ms. Frazier currently serves as the Search Room Coordinator for the Reference Department at the Maryland State Archives, daily assisting patrons in-person and remotely with historical and legal research.

Rachel will be presenting Maryland Land Records. This presentation will teach you how to locate different types of land records, trace the history of land, and discover genealogical information using Maryland Land Records Online (mdlandrec.net).

Meetings of the Carroll County Genealogical Society (CCGS) are held the third Monday of each month, March through May and September through November, at 7:30 p.m.* in the Dixon Room, Westminster Library at 50 East Main Street, Westminster.

Please come to our meeting and bring a friend. You will meet other folks interested in family research and genealogy and enjoy delightful talks that may help you in your own research.  I look forward to seeing new faces!

You can also come early and take advantage of our large collection of books and other materials housed at the Westminster Branch of the CCPL.  On Thursday afternoons, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m., one or more society volunteers will be on hand to assist researchers. Of course, this collection is available to all anytime the library is open.

 *Refreshments are available at 7:00 p.m. and the meetings are free and open to the public.

CCGS Genealogical Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo copyright by Eileen Souza

CCGS Genealogical Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo copyright by Eileen Souza

 

 

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DNA and Me – My Final Ethnicity Test (Maybe)

Posted on September 8, 2016 in Genealogy DNA

Since the new FDA rulings, I was finally able to test my DNA at 23andme. My previous posts on this topic were DNA and Me, which covered my ethnicity tests at Family Tree DNA; followed by DNA and Me – Updated, in which I wrote about my AncestryDNA ethnicity tests.

In general, I was disappointed at my 23andme results. I’m not fond of all those separate reports. It makes it difficult to find anything and when you do, the report doesn’t really tell you much. But this post is about the ethnicity tests.

I have read that 23andme is either the most accurate reporting or the most speculative reporting of ethnicity. In her blog post, Those percentages, if you must, Judy G. Russell, The Legal Genealogist, talked about the confidence reporting levels at 23andme. Thank you, Judy.

When I viewed my report, because of her post, I now knew that the confidence level I was looking at was 50%. Here are my results at this percentage.

My results from 23andme at the 50% confidence level

My results from 23andme at the 50% confidence level

My mother’s paternal line is Irish all the way back to Ireland and her maternal line is German as far back as the 17th and 18th centuries (I have traced some of them back to 1680). My father’s paternal line is Tyrolean (his father) from the section now in Italy, and his maternal line is Italian (his grandfather) and Bohemian (his grandmother), although she may be German Bohemian.

I consider these values generally in line with my own research results, although I would have thought that the Southern European figures would be higher. I have a mini project in mind where I want to record the results from all three companies on a spreadsheet–just for kicks. If do, I’ll probably do a post on it.

I think my real surprise was when I followed Judy’s directions and changed the confidence reporting level to 80%. Here is my report of those results.

My results from 23andme at the 80% confidence level

My results from 23andme at the 80% confidence level

My British & Irish went from 23.1% to 8.0%; my French & German went from 27.1% to 2.8%, while my Italian went from 5.1% to 0.4%. Just think what the 100% confidence reporting level might look like.

But I don’t necessarily believe that this makes 23andme the most speculative. Who knows what would happen to the numbers on the other two sites, if they offered the ability to change confidence reporting levels.

It will be interesting to see how these projections evolve on all three sites as the science improves and the collected data increases.

 

 

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Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 8

Posted on August 30, 2016 in Professional Genealogist

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The final post in this series ends with a brief discussion of some unexpected purchases triggered by the business decisions I made in this start up. The purchases were mostly technical and equipment.

First financial. I had been using Quicken Deluxe for many, many years to maintain our family finances and using Turbo Tax to do our family income tax. Since I planned to have the accountant do the taxes, I no longer needed to acquire Turbo Tax. That was easy. Then I panicked. I knew my son used QuickBooks for his small business and I thought that I would need to buy that and make the investment in its large learning curve.

I found that Quicken offered a less expensive product called Quicken Home and Business. I compared that to QuickBooks and found the big difference is that QuickBooks did payroll, something I did not need. I ordered the Quicken Home and Business software. Upon installing, I discovered that the Home portion was exactly the same as what I was used to and the Business portion was fairly straightforward, although there was some learning curve associated with it. I have been happily using it ever since.

Next, I realized that I hadn’t addressed storage for supplies and client work. For my solution, based on room size and existing furniture, I selected a 5-drawer file cabinet, since I had more up space. Snuggled next to the end of my desk, it also provides me a magnetic surface with quick and easy access.

I already owned two bookcases, a large computer desk that held my desktop (on a wheeled trolley under the desk), my all-in-one printer (on a raised shelf on the desk), and a large format scanner. I felt that I was in good shape for the office with the addition of the new filing cabinet. My decision to begin giving local lectures did generate some other purchases.

My primary focus on my lecture equipment was weight and price. I wanted all of these items to be lightweight, since I needed to carry them around with me. I cart the equipment around nicely packed in a rolling backpack with a laptop sleeve that I bought at eBags.

My initial purchase was a light (for that time period) 14” laptop. The screen size was my compromise since larger screens caused the laptop to weigh more. Its size would allow me to slide this laptop in my tote easily to take to archives and libraries for research. As it had both a VGA and HDMI video connector, it would also be great for driving the projector.

Many of the places where I planned to speak either did not have a projector or the one they had didn’t work. My next purchase was an Acer projector—very lightweight. My final purchase was a Hisonic portable PA system. This system was both lightweight and inexpensive. It came with a built-in handheld mic, and wireless headset and button mic for under $180. The best news was that it actually sounds good. I do not know if it would work in a really large room, but it works perfectly fine in all my local venues. I purchased the PA system in 2010 and I’m still using it. I noticed Amazon is still selling this model and a later one, both less than what I paid.

This post concludes my startup journey as a professional genealogist. The trip acquainted me with genealogy education, selecting a startup team, business planning, branding and networking, lecturing and volunteering, trade shows and business supplies. The earlier seven posts in this series are listed below. I am happy I took the plunge and look forward to what I hope to be a long ongoing journey.

 

See the earlier posts in this series:

Introduction-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 1

Education-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 2

Startup Team-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 3

Business Planning-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 4

Branding & Networking–Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 5

Lecturing & Volunteering–Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 6

Trade Shows-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey-Part 7

 

 

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Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 7

Posted on August 24, 2016 in Professional Genealogist
Figure 1.  The vendor table of Old Bones Genealogy, LLC at the 2013 South Carroll Business Association Community Expo in Eldersburg, Maryland.

Figure 1. The vendor table of Old Bones Genealogy, LLC at the 2013 South Carroll Business Association Community Expo in Eldersburg, Maryland.

To wrap up marketing, I need to discuss trade shows. I discovered our local trade shows as a member of the South Carroll Business Association (SCBA). The SCBA Expo was held annually in the Spring. I found the pricing reasonable and members got an early bird discount. I decided to try it out to see if it was an effective marketing strategy.

I learned about it too late for 2012 so my first show was the SCBA 2013 Expo. I planned for my banner so it would be ready in time for the show. For my first table, I stole the mantle scarf from my fireplace and purchased a large tablecloth to place under it. I’ve received so many compliments on this retro look that I now use it in all my shows. For my display, I included my business cards, brochures, sample fancy pedigree charts, sample of my work, and old photos. I added a guest sign-in sheet. To encourage people to come to my table, I developed a slide show, running it continuously on my laptop.

Well, we were in a big gym in a local high school, there was not a huge turnout and my table was next to an exit door. I had only a couple of visitors and no one signed my guestbook. Another great learning experience. Afterward, many of the vendors gave me good advice that I took to heart and used in future shows. My budget only allowed one show this year.

Figure 2.  My most recent show the SCBA 2016 Expo, held in Eldersburg, Maryland.

Figure 2. My most recent show the SCBA 2016 Expo, held in Eldersburg, Maryland.

While maintaining the basic display, over the years, I added many items suggested by my fellow vendors. The first suggestion I received and implemented was to hold a drawing. Apparently, visitors tend not to sign the guest sign-in sheet but they will fill out entries to win a prize. So now I need to decide what prize to give. I thought about gift cards to restaurants or electric gadgets; but, I finally decided upon a gift certificate for family research. I now award a gift certificate worth three (3) hours of my time to the winner. This has been very popular–this year my big fish bowl was completely filled.

Each successive year added another feature to my display.  I supplemented the display with free candy and free company pens, also very popular. I had also learned how to position my table better. It is all in who you know. In 2016 my table was against a well-lit wall and in direct view of the main entrance—right on the traffic path. I have been informed that I need to add balloons to attract visitors to the table. So far, I have held off since I think it would spoil the look, but who knows…

As to whether trade shows are an effective marketing strategy, the jury is still out. I have noticed that in this profession it can take a long time for a lead to develop into a client. I just added a client this year that attended one of my early lectures four years ago.

With this post, my marketing journey ends.  My next and final topic, technical, concludes my early trip on what I hope to be an ongoing journey.

 
See the earlier posts in this series:
Introduction-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 1
Education-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 2
Startup Team-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 3
Business Planning-Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 4
Branding & Networking–Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 5
Lecturing & Volunteering–Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey–Part 6

 

 

 

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Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 6

Posted on August 16, 2016 in Professional Genealogist
Eileen Souza, Old Bones Genealogy, speaking at the March 2016 meeting of the Carroll County Genealogical Society, Westminster, Maryland. Photo courtesy of Donna Mortenson.

Eileen Souza, Old Bones Genealogy, speaking at the March 2016 meeting of the Carroll County Genealogical Society, Westminster, Maryland. Photo courtesy of Donna Mortenson.

Part 6 of my journey to become a professional genealogist expands my marketing efforts into lecturing and volunteering.

While I had to create and give presentations in my prior career, lecturing on genealogy to the general public and organizations was a very different matter. Generally, the presentations that I had previous done were mostly status reports on various projects I worked on. I knew and worked with everyone who attended and I was paid whether they liked the way I presented or not. In addition, they weren’t very long because everyone was busy and needed to move on to the next meeting.

My genealogy business mentor advised me that lecturing was one of the best ways to get known and attract new clients. My fear of public speaking was high (notice the past tense—after several years it’s much less); but this turned out to be a great learning experience.

I targeted my first presentation, as I have done with most of them, to the beginning family historians. Although I had been researching my own family for many years, I had no experience as to why others might research theirs or how to interview older relatives, since in my case they were all dead when I started. I needed to do a lot of research to flesh out my topic, Getting Started with Your Genealogy. I think the knowledge I acquired preparing this presentation and later ones, added to my knowledge and helped me become a better genealogist.

When completed, I set out to market this presentation to local branches of our county library. I was surprised at how friendly they were and at how happy they seemed to be adding me to their program schedules. My surprise came with my first live lecture at the library in my town. There was a big turnout and everyone was very interested in hearing what I had to say. There were plenty of questions and I found myself enjoying an experience that I had been dreading. To this first presentation, I have since added several other presentations, ending with my latest talk, The ABCs of DNA for Genealogy, which I introduced late last year.

In the past, shyness prevented me from being a joiner or a volunteer but I knew that I needed to get past this to help grow my business. I joined my local county genealogical society, the Carroll County Genealogical Society of Maryland and I started attending meetings. The folks I met at the meetings were great and I really enjoyed myself. After several meetings, I received a phone call from one of the board members asking if I would be Vice-President/Program Chair as this was a vacancy they wanted to fill. I tried several times to say no but I was up against a great salesman. Eventually, she wore me down and I finally agreed. I guess this was volunteering!

Initially, I resisted the ideas of both lecturing and volunteering; but now I wouldn’t have it any other way. The society that I had joined for business reasons became very important to me—much beyond my business. I want to see it grow and flourish. For my sins, I am now president and over the years have met and worked with many hard-working, dedicated and knowledgeable people. I would never have met these folks if I had not moved out of my comfort zone. It seems as if becoming your own boss is also good for personal growth.

This ends my second venture in the world of marketing. My next and final marketing topic expands my experience to trade shows.

See the earlier posts in this series:
Introduction – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 1
Education – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 2
Startup Team – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 3
Business Planning – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 4
Branding and Networking – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 5

 

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Tuesday’s Tip – Try Browsing

Posted on August 9, 2016 in Tuesday's Tip

…the census, that is. I would like to talk about browsing online census records as an effective, although last ditch effort, to finding an ancestor. While you can browse any records, this technique works best with records like the census where you can go through families one by one. This approach can be used with any website housing census records that permits browsing page by page as an option. I used Ancestry.

In this case, I was searching the 1900 US census for my great-grandparents, Bonaventura and Maria Bianchi. I knew they came over in 1888 to locate in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. Bonaventura died in 1906 and was buried in St. Peters Cemetery right outside Mount Carmel, PA. I was pretty sure they had to be in the 1900 US census and living in Mount Carmel, but I could not find them with any search technique I tried so I decided to browse the records.

To do this I performed a search specifically on the 1900 US census by selecting the census year I wished to search from the Records Collection box on the home page of Ancestry. When the search page displays, you can see on the right the option to Browse this collection.

The Browse window asked me to supply a state, county and township. When it came to entering the township, I had three choices: Mount Carmel, Mount Carmel Ward 01, and Mount Carmel Ward 04. Mount Carmel includes Districts 136 through 141. Mount Carmel Ward 01 includes District 135 and Mount Carmel Ward 04 includes District 138, which is already included in Mount Carmel. I felt confident that they lived in one of these three localities, but I did not have a street address so I could not narrow it down any farther. I decided to begin in chronological order with District 135.

As you can see in Figure 1, I selected the state as Pennsylvania, the county as Northumberland and started my browse by entering the township as Mount Carmel Ward 01.

Figure 1. Example of using the Browse this collection option. Source: Ancestry

Figure 1. Example of using the Browse this collection option. Source: Ancestry

I planned to start with page 1 and continue on through all the enumerations districts until I found them or reached the end. I’m not sure I would have attempted this search in a large city, such as, Philadelphia or New York City, at least, not unless I had a more precise location.

I was very lucky with this browse. The family I was searching for appeared on the first image of ED 0135, fourth family down. My great-grandfather, who was head of this family, was named Bonaventura Bianchi, with Bianchi being the surname. But the enumerator recorded the last half of his first name as the family surname and used an incorrectly spelled version of his last name as his first name so the entire family was indexed as Vantura (see Figure 2). I don’t think I would have found it any other way than by browsing.  It is a last ditch effort but can really pay off.

Figure 2 1900 U.S. census, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Mount Carmel Ward 1, Enumeration District (ED) 135, sheet 1-A, dwelling 4, family 4, Biancpi Vantura: digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 9 August 2016)

Figure 2 1900 U.S. census, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Mount Carmel Ward 1, Enumeration District (ED) 135, sheet 1-A, dwelling 4, family 4, Biancpi Vantura: digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 9 August 2016)

 

 

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Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 5

Posted on August 2, 2016 in Professional Genealogist

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Now for the big topic—MARKETING. When it came to marketing, I was completely ignorant. I was an IT Specialist in my prior profession and had taken some college courses in business, finance and accounting but not, heaven forbid, marketing or sales. I truly dreaded this part of the job. In fact, I think it was this component of being self-employed that prevented me from opening my own business sooner. Actually, as you will see, it turned out to be not as bad as I imaged.

Marketing is too encompassing for a single post so I’ve broken it up into three posts: branding and networking, lecturing and volunteering, donations and trade shows. I spread out my marketing investment over three years loosely following these topics. I’ll start this post with branding and networking.

Branding

During my years in the business world (even though it was computer systems), I learned that first-impressions are very important. I was told over and over that the business card is a prospective client’s first impression of you and that this impression will rarely change in the future. My years in my prior career told me that this was probably a reality.

Branding can include many things, logos, business cards, brochures, ads, websites, blogs, give-a-ways, etc. I decided that my first investment would be a logo and a business card. I always use local businesses, if I can. I think my graphic designer, Creative SOL, did a superb job on both the logo and the business card. The final result is the image I have included in this post. The cards are printed on the best stock with a glossy finish. I love them.

Since this depleted my first year budget, I decided to do my own website, after all, I developed Intranet systems in my old job. Sure. Why not?  I have to say the site was nice and flowed okay but let’s face it, I don’t speak marketing. I am not a copywriter. That is not my profession any more than being a graphics designer was. As soon as possible in my second year, I had my website and blog designed and developed by professionals. I used the local firm, Advantage Internet Marketing, and I have been very pleased with what they produced. Their service is great, too. I have received many compliments on it from others.

I added trifold brochures in the third year. Also, designed by Creative SOL.

Networking

Networking is complex and seems to break down into many types. Primarily, I focused on local networking, conferences and social media. For me, social media wasn’t too intimidating, after all, I did not have to meet anyone in person. Since, I was already on Facebook because of my family, I added a business page for Old Bones Genealogy. I then established profiles on Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+. That has been my limit so far for social media sites. I post all my blog posts on these four social media sites. Over time, I have accrued friends on all sites.

One of the business people I met during my logo/business card project, recommended a local networking group called South Carroll Business Association (SCBA), which meets monthly, so I joined it. I also joined a small leads group named South Carroll Business Connections (SCBC) that meets weekly. Later, I added the monthly Carroll Marketing Group (CMG) to my list.

I attended a couple of the meetings of SCBA and CMG feeling like a stranger in a strange land. I wore my usual conservative dark colors and stood around not knowing anyone and too intimidated by all that was going on to initiate any conversation. Until red.

One advantage for me in joining LinkedIn is that I found an article on networking for the introvert. That is definitely me. Reading this article, I found out about the color red. There were many suggestions in this article but I liked the one about wearing bright colors, especially red to attract attention rather than fade into the background. So for the next meeting I wore a red top and jacket. It really works. Folks came over to me and said hello. I felt more at ease and today I really enjoy my time at these meetings.

You are probably wondering why, as a professional genealogist, I would join these groups since they were only local business men and women. What did I get out of it? I discovered that I learned more about marketing and made many valuable connections. And surprisingly got a few customers.

I have been l lucky in that I was able to attend a couple of genealogy conferences in my first years. In 2010, I attended the APG Roundtable, the APG PMC and the FGS Annual Conference in Knoxville, Tennessee. In 2014, I attended the National Genealogical Society (NGS) in Richmond, Virginia. I hope to attend another conference in 2017. These conferences were wonderful—I got to network with my peers and meet some of the names I had only seen on books or the Internet. Conferences are great networking opportunities if you can manage to attend.

This ends my first foray into the world of marketing.  My next topic will expand my experience, increasingly moving out of my comfort zone with lecturing and volunteering.

 

See the earlier posts in this series:

Introduction – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 1

Education – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 2

Startup Team – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 3

Business Planning – Becoming a Professional Genealogist: My Journey – Part 4

 

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Tombstone Tuesday – Theobald Meisberger (1837 – 1900)

Posted on July 26, 2016 in Tombstone Tuesday

My Tombstone Tuesday for this week is the monument of my 2nd great grandfather, Theobald Casper Meisberger, in St. Edward’s Cemetery, Coal Township, Northumberland Co., Pennsylvania.

R12-L21 Theobald Meisberger on monument. Photo courtesy of John Haile

R12-L21 Theobald Meisberger on monument. Photo courtesy of John Haile

The grave is located in range 12, lot 21, grave 1 of the cemetery. He died 13 June 1900 and according to the cemetery record, he was buried 13 June 1900. The grave has a headstone that says Father.

The monument inscription reads

THEOBALD

C.

MEISBERGER

BORN

DEC. 25, 1837.

DIED

June 13, 1900.

AGED

62Y. 5M. 18D.

MEISBERGER

Theobald’s parents were Michel Meisberger (1812 – 1878) and Margarethe Bettinger Meisberger (1807 – 1879). Theobald married Mary Catherine Strausser (1842 – 1897) in 1860. They had nine children, including my ancestor Eva Meisberger (1861 – 1941).

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