52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #26 Candido ‘Condy’ Furlani (1888 – 1938)

Posted on June 30, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 26 is “Halfway: This week marks the halfway point in the year — and the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge! What ancestor do you have that you feel like you’ve only researched halfway? What ancestor do you feel like takes up half of your research efforts?”

For the halfway mark, I have chosen my grandfather, Candido Furlani. Candido went by the name Condy in the United States. I never knew him as he died before I was born. I selected him for this week’s post because I feel that I am only halfway through my research on his line.

The plaza in Vigolo Vattaro ca. 1909 in Tyrol, Austria prior to the town becoming part of Italy in 1918

The plaza in Vigolo Vattaro ca. 1909 in Tyrol, Austria prior to the town becoming part of Italy in 1918

Years ago, I began researching Condy and his family. I was able to find to Family History Library (FHL) microfilm rolls for the baptisms and marriages in his parish in the Diocese of Trento [Trent] in the town of Vigolo Vattaro, Trentino Province, Italy in a region known as Trentino-Alto-Adige/Südtirol.  Prior to WWI, this town was in Tyrol and part of the Austrian-Hungary Empire.

I am about halfway through each microfilm. I have it on my To-Do list to start going back to my local Family History Center (FHC) to finish viewing them. This is what I have so far on my Furlani surname.

My grandfather, Candido Luigi Furlani, son of Giovanni Battista Domenico Furlani and Maria Dominica Dallabrida, was born on 26 Mar 1888 in Vigolo Vattaro, Tyrol, Austria. He died on 18 Feb 1938 of black lung disease in Cambria, Pennsylvania, USA (State Sanatorium #2). He married Anna Bianchi on 20 Sep 1911 in Saint Peter’s RC Church, Mount Carmel, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. She was born on 16 Jan 1894 in Mount Carmel. She died on 21 Mar 1973 in Media, Delaware County, PA.

My great-grandfather, Giovanni Battista Domenico Furlani, son of Giovanni Battista Domenico Furlani and Catterina Dominica Marchi, was born on 08 Feb 1858 in Vigolo Vattaro. He died about 1910 in Vigolo Vattaro. He married Maria Dominica Dallabrida about 1882 in Vigolo Vattaro.

My great-grandmother, Maria Dominica Dallabrida, daughter of Valentino Dallabrida and Dominica Filomena Martinelli Dallabrida, was born on 01 Aug 1858 in Vigolo Vattaro, Tyrol, Austria. She died about 1930 in Vigolo Vattaro, Trentino, Italy.

My 2nd great-grandfather, Giovanni Battista Domenico Furlani, son of Giovanni Battista Furlani and Maria Nicoletti, was born on 24 Sep 1830 and died about 1889 in Vigolo Vattaro. He married Catterina Dominica Marchi on 25 Feb 1854 in Vigolo Vattaro.

My 2nd great-grandmother, Catterina Dominica Marchi, daughter of Bartolo Marchi and Barbara Nicoletti, was born about 1834 and died about 1894 in Vigolo Vattaro.

My 3rd great-grandfather, Giovanni Battista Furlani was born about 1810 and died about 1865 in Vigolo Vattaro. He married Maria Nicoletti about 1832 in Vigolo Vattaro.

My 3rd great-grandmother, Maria Nicoletti was born about 1810 and died about 1870 in Vigolo Vattaro.

 

Week 26 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #25 Three Old Family Homes

Posted on June 23, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 25 is “The Old Homestead: Have you visited an ancestral home? Do you have photos of an old family house? Do you have homesteading ancestors?”

I have three photographs of old family homes—one that I took and two that I found in that ubiquitous box of photos inherited from my mother.

The first home is that of my paternal grandparents, Condy and Anna Bianchi Furlani. I have not been able to find a deed for their purchase of this home. They were married in 1911 and I know they were not living here when my father was born in 1912. I have the deed from when the house was sold in 1974 to settle the estate of my grandmother, Anna Bianchi Furlani Profit, who died 21 March 1973. My grandfather has already died in 1938 so I never met him.

525 W. Girard St., Village of Atlas, Mt. Carmel Twp., Northumberland Co., PA

525 W. Girard St., Village of Atlas, Mt. Carmel Twp., Northumberland Co., PA

 

I remember visiting her during the summer when I was a child. At that time, the back of the house faced the foothills of a small mountain across a road. There were huge snowball bushes along the side of the house, no shed and next to it an open field.

My sister and I used to climb up the foothills early in the morning to collect huckleberries for our breakfast. We also liked watching the “billy goats” that roamed the hills. Today, there are no hills or mountain—it has been mined to the ground and the road is now a four-lane highway. So sad…

The second and homes are my unknowns. I feel sure that these homes belonged to my maternal ancestors and relatives. My second great grandfather, Theobald Meisberger, over time, had purchased four lots in Coal Twp., Northumberland Co., PA; and he built four houses on them. On his death, they were inherited by his children and their spouses. Most of my other ancestors and relatives only rented.

I do not know the owners or location of either of these two homes, only that they are most likely in the Ranshaw area of Coal Township (which I believe is now a suburb of the city of Shamokin).

Single family home decorated for July 4th

Single family home decorated for July 4th

 

Duplex home fronting on a street

Duplex home fronting on a street

 

I can’t really make out any of the faces in either photo. The photos do not enlarge well and tend to become pixelated. I welcome feedback from anyone who can shed some light on these photos. Let me know with your comments if you recognize the either the homes or any of the family members shown.

 

 

 

Week 25 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #24 A Sentimental Heirloom

Posted on June 17, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History, Family Memories
Valentine's Day card -  Marguerite Noble Furlani to William C. Furlani 1945

Valentine’s Day card – Marguerite Noble Furlani to William C. Furlani 1945

The theme for Week 23 is “Heirloom: What heirloom do you treasure? Who gave it to you? What heirloom do you wish you had?”

I found this card in the box of photos that my sisters and I inherited from our parents. This is a Valentine’s card that my mother, Marguerite “Mickey” Noble Furlani, sent to my father, William Condy Furlani, for Valentine’s Day 1945.

The enclosed letter, written by my mother, says at the top “A lock of Eileen’s hair” and, at the bottom “With love and kisses to dady, Eileen.” My mother’s note at the bottom states, “Eileen wrote this.”

I find this hard to believe as I would have been two years old at the time but the handwriting is different. I suspect my mother guided my hand. Although why did she misspell daddy?

My father, at that time, was still in military service for WWII. He enlisted in the Army on 10 January 1944 in New Cumberland, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He was discharged on 7 December 1945 at the Separation Center in [Fort] Indiantown Gap, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania.

Sometime prior to February of 1945, my father stepped on a landmine in Germany and he was hospitalized. I have a postcard from U.S.A.H.P. 4167, APO 118, c/o Postmaster New York that states on 9 March 1945, he was convalescing from a wound of the left leg. This postcard does not say where he is convalescing. According to his pension application, he was in Foreign Service until 1 December 1945. His Foreign Service period began on 11 August 1944.

I think I remember him saying that he was hospitalized in England at some point in time. The wound left shrapnel in his leg and caused him to walk with a slight limp the rest of his life.

While I have several items I inherited from my parents, this card is my favorite.

 

 

Week 24 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #23 The Anniversary Is the Same

Posted on June 8, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 23 is “Wedding: June is time for weddings. Write about a June bride in your family or highlight a favorite wedding photo. Maybe there’s a serial marry-er in the family — that could be a fun post!”

My 33rd wedding anniversary is approaching on 12 June; so I am highlighting those couples in my family tree whose wedding also occurred on 12 June. A search of my database revealed two couples who meet this criterion.

Mary Viola Gunther, my great-aunt, married John J. Schuck on 12 June 1907 in Coal Township, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. Most likely, they were married either in St. Edward’s church (now Mother Cabrini), since both were buried in this cemetery; or in St. Joseph’s church (now Our Lady of Hope), also in Coal Township.

Their daughter and my first cousin once removed, Marguerite Schuck (1920 – 2004) married Clement E. Konetski (abt. 1916 – 1992) on 12 June 1940 in St. Joseph’s church in Coal Township. They are both buried in St. Edward’s cemetery in Coal Township.

Related to these families but not part of the anniversary is the same theme are Mary Viola Gunther’s parents, Andrew C. Gunther (1858 – 1931) and Eva Meisberger (1861 – 1941). Andrew and Eva were married on 11 February 1884 in St. Edward’s church in Coal Township. Here is the oldest photo in my collection and, what I believe is their wedding photo.

Probable wedding photo of Andrew Gunther and Eva Meisberger 11 Feb 1884

Probable wedding photo of Andrew Gunther and Eva Meisberger 11 Feb 1884

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 23 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #22 William C. Furlani (1912 – 1989) – Commencements

Posted on June 2, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 22 is “Commencement: Countless schools will be having their commencement ceremonies around this time. Think not only about school, but also about commencement meaning “a beginning”.

My father, William Condy Furlani, was born 9 April 1912 in Connorsville, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, the son of Condy Furlani and Anna Bianchi Furlani. Recently, I was doing some research on Ancestry.com and found they had the yearbooks for Bloomsburg State Teachers College (now Bloomsburg University), Bloomsburg, Columbia County, Pennsylvania.

Wm. C. Furlani, The Orbitor, Bloomsburg State Teacher's College, Class of 1932

Wm. C. Furlani, The Orbitor, Bloomsburg State Teacher’s College, Class of 1932

I was able to retrieve many pages featuring my father for his class years 1931 and 1932, including the entry for his 1932 graduation. He received a teaching certificate.

William C. Furlani Senior Class photo, M.C.H.S, Class of 1930

William C. Furlani Senior Class photo, M.C.H.S, Class of 1930

 

To continue with the theme of commencement, I found a copy of the actual commencement invitation for my father. He graduated from Mount Carmel High School, located in Locust Gap, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, as part of the Class of 1930.

Invitation to the Mt. Carmel High School Commencement for the Class of 1930

Invitation to the Mt. Carmel High School Commencement for the Class of 1930

 

 

 

 

 

My father was an elementary school teacher, teaching fifth and/or sixth grades in the Leedom Estates Elementary School, Leedom Estates, Delaware County, Pa., until his retirement in 1977. I occasionally see comments on my posts from former students. They all say that he was tough but they really learned a lot in his classes and still remember him. He also taught arts and crafts at the school during the summers. I remember attending some of these sessions—making baskets and having a great time.

 

 

Week 22 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #21 Michael Meisberger, Jr. (1839 – 1914) – Amazing Find in Military Records

Posted on June 2, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

The theme for Week 21 is “Military: This week, the United States will be observing Memorial Day. Do you have any military ancestors? Were any ancestors affected by the military or by war?” I would like to use this theme loosely to write about my 3rs great-uncle, Michael Meisberger, Jr., who served in the Civil War.

Michael is the brother of my 3rd great-grandfather, Theobald Meisberger, and the son of Michel Meisberger and Margaret Bettinger, who with another brother and four sisters, were the original immigrants, settling in Coal Township, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania in 1853.

He was a Union private Company A, 8th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry during the early Civil War. The 1879 US census showed Michael and his family living in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. In 1891, Michael filed for his pension in Chicago. The initial filing of his widow, Gertrude, gave Michael’s death as 9 August 1914 in Fowler, Benton, Indiana.

In July of 2012, I visited the National Archives (NARA) in Washington, DC and copied Michael’s entire pension file to my flash drive. When I returned home, I started reviewing it to see what types of documents it might contain. I suddenly spotted the word “born” in the current document. I found I was looking at an affidavit to a Justice of the Peace in Benton County, Indiana prepared and signed on 3 May 1913.

Michael Meisberger, Jr., Affadavit of Birth 3 May 1913, Source: Image from original Civil War Invalid Pension File, NARA Application #982958 and Certificate #800506

Michael Meisberger, Jr., Affadavit of Birth 3 May 1913, Source: Image from original Civil War Invalid Pension File, NARA Application #982958 and Certificate #800506

The key information contained in this document is:

“…he was born about three miles from Ottweiler in Rhenish Prussia on the 26th day of February. 1839, and was christened in the Catholic parish of the said city of Ottweiler.”

That town or village turned out to be Steinbach, which today is a suburb of Ottweiler, Saarland, Germany. Because of this document, I now have images of the marriage certificate for Michel Meisberger and Margaret Bettinger, providing their birth towns and parents and birth certificates for all their children, including my 3rd great-grandfather, Theobald. It does pay to research collateral lines to break down “brick walls.”

 

 

Week 21 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #20 Anna Bianchi (1894 – 1973) – (nearly Wordless Wednesday)

Posted on May 20, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History, Wordless Wednesday
Photo of Anna Bianchi, aged 2, dated abt. 1896

Photo of Anna Bianchi, aged 2, dated abt. 1896

This photo was in the box of photos that my sisters and I inherited from our mother. The child is my paternal grandmother, Anna Bianchi Furlani. Anna born on 16 January 1894 in Atlas, Mount Carmel Township, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, is the daughter of Bonaventura Bianchi, of Italy, and Maria Bunt Bianchi, of Bohemia. She was baptized 11 February 1894 in Our Lady of Mount Carmel RC church in Mount Carmel.

On 20 September 1911, at the age of 17, she married Candido (Condy) Furlani in St. Peter’s RC church in Atlas, Northumberland, Pennsylvania. Condy died in 1938 before my parents married so I never knew him, but I have many fond memories of my grandmother. Together they had three children, William Condy Furlani (1912 – 1989), Dorothy A. Furlani (1913 – 1982), and Robert A. Furlani (1917 – 1996).

Anna passed away on 21 March 1973 at the age of 77 and is buried next to my grandfather, Candido, in St. Peter’s cemetery, Mount Carmel, Northumberland, Pennsylvania.

 

 

Week 20 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #19 Peter Bianchi (1882 – 1922) – A Quandary

Posted on May 14, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History

This week’s theme is “There’s a Way: What ancestor found a way out of a sticky situation? You might also think of this in terms of transportation or migration.” I am using this theme to see if I can find a way out of a conflict I discovered in Peter’s records.

Before, they were available on Ancestry.com, I sent away for some Pennsylvania death certificates, under the new law, in November 2012. I received most of the certificates on 29 March 2013. My surprise came when I reviewed the death certificate for Peter Bianchi.

In fact, it was a real shocker. First, some background…

Peter Bianchi, 1882 - 1922

Peter Bianchi, 1882 – 1922

Peter Bianchi, who is my great-uncle, is the eldest son of Bonaventura (aka Victor) and Maria [Bunt] Bianchi. His parents were born in Italy and Bohemia.

Bonaventura and Maria Bianchi immigrated to the US on 1 Dec 1888 with their young family.  They came to the US on the ship SS Noordland out of Antwerp, Belgium with four children-one an infant.  They had been living in Dudelingen, Luxembourg.   Peter’s age on the passenger list is 5.  After the birth of another child in New York, the family came to Hazelton, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania; and sometime between July 1893 and January 1894, they moved to Mount Carmel, Northumberland County, where they remained.

The 1900 US Federal census has Peter, born June 1882 in Prussia, living with his parents in Mt. Carmel, Northumberland County, PA.  In the 1910 and 1920 US Federal censuses, Peter, born in Germany, is married and living in his own home in Mt. Carmel.

His Pennsylvania marriage license and registration shows that Peter Bianchi married Katie Gower on 25 July 1908 in Shamokin, Northumberland County, PA.  His parents are listed as Victor and Mary Bianchi of Mt. Carmel.  Her parents are listed as Earnest and Kate Gower of Shamokin.

Peter’s WWI draft registration card states his name as Peter Paul Bianchi, born 24 June 1882, married to Catherine, working at the P&R Coal Co. as a miner and living at 528 123rd St., Mt. Carmel, Northumberland County, PA.

In the 1930 US Federal census, Katherine is listed as a widow.

The death certificate listed his parents as Peter and Julia Bianchi born in Austria.  Peter was listed as having died on 5 January 1922 in Mt. Carmel, Northumberland County, PA.  His birthdate and birthplace were listed as 1 May 1883 and Pennsylvania [I think it states Penna but it is difficult to read]. Chas Bianchi of Mt. Carmel, who is his brother, supplied the information.

Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 7859 (1922), Peter Bianchi; Division of Vital Records, New Castle.

Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 7859 (1922), Peter Bianchi; Division of Vital Records, New Castle.

My questions are:

Why wouldn’t his brother know who their parents are? There is no other Charles or Peter Bianchi in Mt. Carmel or in Northumberland County in this time.
Is there a way for me to resolve this conflict?
I would be interested in knowing what my next step should be. Should I just disregard it as an anomaly? What might I do to reconcile these statements with all the other evidence I have collected.

 

 

Week 19 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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52 Ancestors 2015 Edition: #18 Agatha Ficca (1921 – 1994) (Tombstone Tuesday)

Posted on May 5, 2015 in 52 Ancestors, Family History
Headstone of Agatha Ficca nee Hullihan at St. Peter's Cemetery, Mt. Carmel, PA

Headstone of Agatha Ficca nee Hullihan at St. Peter’s Cemetery, Mt. Carmel, PA

Agatha Ficca is my first cousin once removed. Agatha is the daughter of Dominic (Connie) Ficca and Helen (Bianchi) Ficca. She was born in Mount Carmel, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania and lived there for most of her life.

Agatha married Vincent T. Hullihan, son of Thomas and Mary J. Hullihan. I realize I need to send away for the parish registers for this family. I have added this to my To-Do list. I may have difficulty obtaining additional information since Agatha and Vincent were married sometime in the 1940s.

Vincent taught shorthand at Mount Carmel high school in 1942, having just graduated from Bloomsburg College in 1941. He was a Marine lieutenant during WWII and was wounded in action.

Footstone of Vincent T. Hullihan at St. Peter's Cemetery, Mt. Carmel, PA

Footstone of Vincent T. Hullihan at St. Peter’s Cemetery, Mt. Carmel, PA

Agatha died in 1994, aged 73, while Vincent died on 21 Oct 1998 at the age of 78. Both are buried in St. Peter’s cemetery in Mount Carmel, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania.

 

Week 18 of 52 Ancestors 2015 Edition, a blogging challenge initiated by Amy Johnson Crow in her blog No Story Too Small.

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Society Saturday – German Catholic Influence in Western Maryland

Posted on May 2, 2015 in Society Saturday

CCGSLogoB&W smThe Carroll County Genealogical Society’s upcoming meeting on Monday, May 18, 2015 at 7:30 PM features John Foertschbeck, Sr. John H. Foertschbeck, Sr. was born and raised in the Highlandtown and Canton neighborhoods of southeast Baltimore, but has lived in Woodbine, Carroll County, MD since 1968.  He attended and graduated from Sacred Heart of Jesus in Highlandtown and Mt. St. Joseph’s High School.

After retiring as a Computer Systems Analyst / Project Manager for the U.S. Government, John founded Information Processing Specialists and worked several more years as an Information Technology consultant.  In his retirement years, John parlayed his technical expertise with his interest in local history and researching his own genealogy focusing primarily on his German background.

In 2008, he self-published his first book, Woodbine on the B&O, followed by Same War – Different Missions, WW II Letters Home (2009); Carroll and Frederick County Canneries (2010); and his latest book German Catholic Parishes of Maryland and Pennsylvania (2013).

The Carroll County Community Media Center named John the 2010 History Project Volunteer of the Year.  John worked with other volunteers and videotaped over thirty interviews of Carroll County residents highlighting their life experiences growing up and/or living in Carroll County.

John is a member of the Maryland Genealogical Society, the Maryland Historical Society, the Carroll County Genealogical Society, the Carroll County Community Media Center, the Historical Society of Carroll County, and the Mt. Airy Historical Society.  John is a member, and was the Baltimore chapter president, regional president and a national director of the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP) (formerly DPMA).

John will be presenting German Catholic Influence in Western Maryland. German Catholics? Weren’t all Germans Lutheran or Reformed? No, not all Germans were Protestants; a significant number of German speakers in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and the USA are Catholics. In colonial English North America, Catholics were unquestionably a minority in Maryland and Pennsylvania and almost non-existent in the other colonies. German Catholics were even fewer, first appearing in the Philadelphia area in the early to mid-1700s and Baltimore in the late 1790s.

John traces the arrival of German Catholics in Philadelphia and Baltimore and their migrating to the surrounding counties western counties of Pennsylvania and Maryland.  John will address the rapid growth of the Catholic Church after the American War of Independence and the contribution of German Catholics throughout the 19th century focusing on western Maryland counties.

Meetings of the Carroll County Genealogical Society (CCGS) are held the third Monday of each month, March through May and September through November, at 7:30 p.m. in the Dixon Room, Westminster Library at 50 East Main Street, Westminster. The meetings are free and open to the public.  An annual dinner is held each June and a holiday party each December.  These are for members and their guests, with reservations made in advance.

Please come to our meeting and bring a friend. You will meet other folks interested in family research and genealogy and enjoy delightful talks that may help you in your own research.  I look forward to seeing new faces!

You can also come early and take advantage of our large collection of books and other materials housed at the Westminster Branch of the CCPL.  On Thursday afternoons, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m., one or more society volunteers will be on hand to assist researchers. Of course, this collection is available to all anytime the library is open.

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

The CCGS Genealogy Section at the Westminster Branch Library. Photo by Eileen Souza

 

 

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